A Short History of the E-Government Track at HICSS

HICSS50 Hilton Waikoloa Village, Big Island

13 Minitracks

Organizers/Proposers: Gregory B. White, Wm. Arthur Conklin, Keith B. Harrison, Mihoko Sakurai, Emma S. Spiro, Jose J. Gonzalez, Theresa A. Pardo, Elin Wihlborg, Lei Zheng, Devinder Thapa, Mathias Hatakka, Matt Bishop, Dr. Kara Nance, Jason W. Clark, Marijn Janssen, Yannis Charalabidis, Helmut Krcmar, Mitch Cochran, John Carlo Bertot, Scott P. Robertson, Antonio Cordella, Frank Bannister, Peter Parycek, Ludwig Christian Schaupp, Jay P. Kesan, Luis Felipe Luna-Reyes, Else Negre, Camille Rosenthal-Sabroux, Mila Gascó-Hernández, Rony Medaglia, Euripidis Loukis, Margit Scholl, Frederick Sheldon, Robert K. Abercrombie, Xiaohui Cui, Miriam Lips, Leif Skiftenes Flak, J. Ramón Gil-García, Tony Coulson, Hans J (Jochen) Scholl, and Lemuria Carter.

The best paper award 2017 went to Rony Medaglia, Jonas Hedman, and Ben Eaton for their paper entitled “Public-Private Collaboration in the Emergence of a National Electronic Identification Policy: The Case of NemID in Denmark” presented in the Policies and Strategies for Digital Government Minitrack, which was chaired by Antonio Cordella, Frank Bannister, and Peter Parycek.

From 112 submissions, 59 papers were accepted and presented in 22 sessions.

One Symposium Smart cities: Bringing research and practice together

Committee: Mila Gascó-Hernández (lead), Hans J. Scholl, Lemuria Carter, Theresa A. Pardo, J. Ramón Gil-García, and Mitch Cochran.

The 10th e-Government Symposium focused on the topic of smart cities to kick off the activities of the HICSS-50 e-Government Track.

During the daylong meeting, e-government stakeholders discussed issues such as the challenges cities face nowadays, the different definitions of smart cities, the diverse strategies undertaken by different cities in order to become smart, the role of stakeholders (companies, universities, and citizens, among other), the contribution of the academy to the smart city “movement,” the operationalization of smart cities, the overcoming of silo management (which has been the traditional way cities and counties have been managed), and the contribution of big data or the Internet of Things. Participants also evaluated the impact and the transformation in cities brought about by the transition to smartness, including quantitative and qualitative assessments. Theoretical approaches but, also, case studies of successes and failures were presented in order to collect several learned lessons that may be useful for researchers and practitioners with an interest in this field.

The meeting was complemented with a Smart Cities and Smart Government Research-Practice Consortium (SCSGRPC) session. The SCSGRPC is a robust global research community focused on innovations in technology, management, and policy that change the fabric of the world’s cities. Through purposeful networking, and collaborative and connected research, the Consortium members come together to share ideas, new knowledge, and research and practice innovations in the interest of increasing opportunity for all those who live in and work in these cities. The SCSGRP Consortium is based at the Center for Technology in Government, University at Albany, State University of New York.

The symposium complemented the paper sessions of the HICSS E-Government Track.

HICSS49 Grand Hyatt, Koloa/Kauai, 2016

12 Minitracks

Organizers/Proposers: Yannis Charalabidis, Marijn Janssen, Helmut Krcmar, Wm. Arthur Conklin, Jim Ramsay, Jay P. Kesan, Carlos E. Jiménez, Mila Gascó, Tino Schuppan, Theresa A. Pardo, Elin Wihlborg, Ricardo Gomez, Øystein Sæbø, Luis Fernando Baron, Frank L. Greitzer, Russell Palarea, COL Ronald C Dodge JR, Scott P. Robertson, John Carlo Bertot, Mitch Cochran, Antonio Cordella, Frank Bannister, Peter Parycek, Ludwig Christian Schaupp, Lemuria Carter, Gregory B. White, Rayford B. Vaughn, Jr., Elsa Negre, Camille Rosenthal-Sabroux, Marko M. Skoric, Suha AlAwadhi, Margit Scholl, Leif Skiftenes Flak, Victor Bekkers, Albert Meijer, and Hans J (Jochen) Scholl.

The best paper award 2016 went to Mihoko Sakurai, Richard T. Watson, and Jiro Kokuryo for their paper entitled “How do Organizational Processes Recover Following a Disaster? - A Capital Resiliency Model for Disaster Preparedness” presented in the Resilience Against Crises and Disasters Minitrack.

From over 90 submissions, 44 papers in 15 sessions were accepted

One Symposium Realizing the Promise of Social Media (in the Public Sector)

Committee: Mila Gascó (lead), Hans J. Scholl, and Lemuria Carter.

The 9th e-Government Symposium focused on adoption and use of social media by public administrations to kick off the activities of the HICSS-48 e-Government Track.

During the daylong meeting, e-government stakeholders discussed issues such as the challenges social media pose to public administrations, the different social media strategies public administrations can follow, the contribution of social media to open government, the factors that influence social media adoption and use by governments, the role of social media in co-producing public services, or the reactions of citizens and users to different social media communication strategies. They also evaluated the impact and the transformation brought about by social media, including quantitative and qualitative assessments. Theoretical approaches but, also, case studies of successes and failures were presented in order to collect several learned lessons that may be useful for researchers and practitioners with an interest in this field.

The symposium also hosted the Smart Cities and Smart Government Research-Practice Consortium. The Consortium is a robust global research community focused on innovations in technology, management and policy that change the fabric of the world’s cities. Through purposeful networking, and collaborative and connected research, the Consortium members come together to share ideas, new knowledge, and research and practice innovations in the interest of increasing opportunity for all those who live in and work in these cities.

The symposium complemented the paper sessions of the HICSS E-Government Track.

HICSS48 Grand Hyatt, Koloa/Kauai, 2015

11 Minitracks

Organizers/Proposers: Yannis Charalabidis, Marijn Janssen, Helmut Krcmar, Wm. Arthur Conklin, Jim Ramsay, Jay P. Kesan, Carlos E. Jiménez, Mila Gascó, Tino Schuppan, Theresa A. Pardo, Elin Wihlborg, Ricardo Gomez, Øystein Sæbø, Luis Fernando Baron, Frank L. Greitzer, Russell Palarea, COL Ronald C Dodge JR, Scott P. Robertson, John Carlo Bertot, Mitch Cochran, Antonio Cordella, Frank Bannister, Peter Parycek, Ludwig Christian Schaupp, Lemuria Carter, Gregory B. White, Rayford B. Vaughn, Jr., Wm. Arthur Conklin, Elsa Negre, Camille Rosenthal-Sabroux, Marko M. Skoric, Suha AlAwadhi, Margit Scholl, Leif Skiftenes Flak, Victor Bekkers, Albert Meijer, and Hans J (Jochen) Scholl.

The best paper award 2015 went to Marlen C. Jurisch, Markus Kautz, Petra Wolf, and Helmut Krcmar for their paper entitled “An International Survey of the Factors Influencing the Intention to use Open Government” presented in the Open, Anticipatory and Participatory Government Minitrack.

From 87 submissions, 43 papers in 13 sessions were accepted

One Symposium Innovating Together: Co-creation and Co-production of Public Services

Committee: Mila Gascó (lead), Victor Bekkers, Lemuria Carter, Albert Meijer, and Ines Mergel.

The 8th e-Government Symposium focused on "Innovating together: Co-production and co-creation of public services” to kick off the activities of the HICSS-48 e-Government Track.

During the daylong meeting, e-government stakeholders discussed issues such as the challenges of open innovation in the public sector, the differences between co-creation (open innovation) and co-production (open services), the different types of co-creation, the characteristics of co-production initiatives, the factors that influence co-production and co-creation with citizens, the incentives that citizens have to be involved in co-production, the role of open data and social media in co-producing public services. They also evaluated the impact and the transformation brought about by ICT-driven co-production experiences, including quantitative and qualitative assessments. Theoretical approaches but, also, case studies of successes and failures were presented in order to collect several learned lessons that may be useful for researchers and practitioners with an interest in this field.


The symposium complemented the paper sessions of the HICSS E-Government Track.

HICSS47 Hilton Waikoloa, 2014

10 Minitracks

Organizers/Proposers: Akemi Takeoka Chatfield, Jose J. Gonzalez, Tina Comes, Theresa A. Pardo, Tino Schuppan, Samuel Fosso Wamba, Elsa Estevez, Wojciech Cellary, Jim Davies, Wm. Arthur Conklin, Rayford B. Vaughn, Jr., Gregory B. White, Dawn M. Cappelli, John C. Bertot, Mitch Cochran, Marijn Janssen, Yannis Charalabidis, Helmut Krcmar, Peter Parycek, Frank Bannister, Antonio Cordella, Ludwig C. Schaupp, Lemuria Carter, Rodrigo Sandoval Almazan, Suha AlAwadhi, Jay P. Kesan, Marko M. Skoric, J. Ramon Gil-Garcia, Miriam Lips, Leif Skiftenes Flak, Scott Robertson, and Hans J (Jochen) Scholl.

The best paper award 2014 went to Jooho Lee and Soonhee Kim for their paper entitled "Active Citizen E-Participation in Local Governance: Do Individual Social Capital and E-Participation Management Matter?"

Forty eight papers in 10 sessions were accepted
One Symposium How has e- Government research influenced practice? What’s next? Where do we go from here?

Committee: Lemuria Carter (lead), John Bertot, Akemi Chatfield, Jay Kesan, Scott Robertson, and Hans Jochen Scholl. Key speakers were Mississipi State CIO Dr. Craig Orgeron, Dr. Ramón Rufín, Head of the Marketing Research Group, UNED, and eHawaii.gov Director Russell Castagnaro.

The 7th e-Government Symposium focused on "15 Years of E-Government Research: What is the Impact on Practice?” to kick off the activities of the HICSS-47 e-Government Track.

During the daylong meeting, e-government stakeholders discussed the challenges of implementing and managing e-government initiatives, the acceptance of e-government initiatives by both government agencies and citizens, case studies of successes and lessons learned, e-government in developing economies, and where they see e-government going in the future from the perspectives of their localities. We evaluated the impact of and the transformation brought about by e-government including quantitative and qualitative assessments. Citizens who have themselves used ICTs to influence government also provided their experiences and perspectives on the usefulness of ICTs and their idea of e-government initiatives in the future. Attendees participated in discussion and workshop sessions to identify common issues and opportunities for research-practice collaborations.


The symposium complemented the paper sessions of the HICSS E-Government Track.

HICSS46Maui, 2013

10 Minitracks

Organizers/Proposers: Bjoern Niehaves, Theresa A. Pardo, Samuel Fosso Wamba, Kenneth R. Fleischmann, Rowena Cullen, Frank Bannister, Peter Parycek, Jay Kesan, Suha AlAwadhi, Ron Dodge, Aaron Ferguson, Dawn Cappelli, Gregory White, Wm Arthur Conklin, Ray Vaughn, Miriam Lips, J. Ramon Gil-Garcia, Akemi Takeoka Chatfield, John C. Bertot, Karine Nahon, Scott Roberson, Lemuria Carter, Jing Zhang, L. Christian Schaupp,Yannis Charalabidis, Marijn Janssen, Tomasz Janowski, Wojciech Cellary, Jim Davies, and Hans Jochen Scholl.

The best paper award 2013 went to Mohammed A. Gharawi and Sharon S. Dawes for their paper entitled "Exploring the Influence of Contextual Distances on Transnational Public Sector Knowledge Networks: A Comparative Study."

Forty two papers in 16 sessions were accepted
Two Symposia Symposium I: Four Years Of Open Government: An Appraisal

Committee: Lemuria Carter (lead), John Bertot, Akemi Chatfield, Sharon Dawes, Niko Kroustalias, Jay Kesan, Scott Robertson, and Hans Jochen Scholl. Key speakers were Mississipi State CIO Dr. Craig Orgeron, Dr. Ramón Rufín, Head of the Marketing Research Group, UNED, and eHawaii.gov Director Russell Castagnaro.

The e-Government Symposium was a highly interactive setting, in which researchers, educators, policy makers, developers, citizens, and practitioners discussed issues and found common ground. E-government transforms relationships among multiple stakeholders, addressing the continuing challenges of enhancing participation, being responsive and aware of citizens' concerns, keeping up with new technologies, and supporting economic and political wellbeing.

During a daylong meeting, practitioners discussed issues such as the challenges of implementing and managing e-government solutions, the acceptance of e-government by government agencies and citizens, case studies of successes and lessons learned, e-government in developing economies, and where they saw e-government going in the future from the perspectives of their localities. Citizens who themselves used ICTs to influence government also provided their experiences and perspectives on the usefulness of ICTs and their idea of e-government in the future. Attendees participated in discussion and workshop sessions and identified common issues and opportunities for research-practice collaborations.

Symposium II: Insider Threats

Committee: Dawn Cappelli, Aaron Ferguson, and Ron Dodge.


Predicting malicious insider threat activity is an increasingly difficult challenge as evidenced by the WikiLeaks events occurring late last year. Despite research into the psychology and motivation of malicious insiders, predicting insider attacks is a non-trivial process. According to Greitzer and Frincke (2010), the two most significant challenges in developing a predictive analytic methodology for insider threat detection are: (1) defining precursors--events prior to the attack)--in terms of observable cyber and psychosocial indicators; and (2) developing a methodology that integrates these indicators. Researchers from government, industry, and academia have proposed promising technical solutions for detecting insider threat activity; often based on violation of some policy, e.g., unauthorized use of removable media. However, very few of these solutions provide predictive analytic capabilities that can: (a) predict the likelihood of malicious insider threat activity with a high degree of certainty and fidelity; or (b) be used operationally in an enterprise environment.
This symposium explored how government, academia, and industry can develop data-driven, high-fidelity, predictive analytics for insider threat detection and mitigation. Identifying operational methodologies for predicting insider threat behavior based on user behavior is critical as organizations seek to prevent fraud, theft of intellectual property, sabotage, and espionage. The topics areas discussed predictive analytic-based approaches to Insider Threat detection, solution development, and future vision, as well as related issues. Novel research involving new methods or insight into developing predictive analytics for insider threat detection and defense is appropriate for this symposium.

 

The two symposia complemented the paper sessions of the HICSS E-Government Track.

HICSS45Maui, 2012

10 Minitracks

Organizers/Proposers: Bjoern Niehaves, Theresa A. Pardo, Samuel Fosso Wamba, Kenneth R. Fleischmann, Rowena Cullen, Frnak Bannister, Jay Kesan, Suha AlAwadhi, Ron Dodge, Aaron Ferguson, Dawn Cappelli, Gregory White, Wm Arthur Conklin, Ray Vaughn, Miriam Lips, J. Ramon Gil-Garcia, Maddalena Sorrentino, John C. Bertot, Karine Nahon, Scott Roberson, Lemuria Carter, Jing Zhang, L. Christian Schaupp Yannis Charalabidis, Marijn Janssen, Olivier Glassey, Ralf Klischewski, Tomasz Janowski, Jim Davies, and Hans Jochen Scholl.

The best paper award 2012 went to Ralf Klischewski for his paper entitled "Identifying Informational Needs for Open Government: The Case of Egypt."

Forty six papers in 16 sessions were accepted
Symposium 21st Century Government: E-Government in Practice

Committee: Scott Robertson (lead), John Bertot, Lemuria Carter, Akemi Chatfield, Sharon Dawes, Niko Kroustalias, Joseph Teo, and Hans Jochen Scholl. Key speakers were Hawaii State CIO Sonny Bhagowalia, City and County of Honolulu CIO Gordon C. Bruce, eHawaii.gov Director Russell Castagnaro, and CISCO Director Norman Jacknis.

The e-Government Symposium was a highly interactive setting, in which researchers, educators, policy makers, developers, citizens, and practitioners discussed issues and found common ground. E-government transforms relationships among multiple stakeholders, addressing the continuing challenges of enhancing participation, being responsive and aware of citizens' concerns, keeping up with new technologies, and supporting economic and political wellbeing.

During a daylong meeting, practitioners discussed issues such as the challenges of implementing and managing e-government solutions, the acceptance of e-government by government agencies and citizens, case studies of successes and lessons learned, e-government in developing economies, and where they saw e-government going in the future from the perspectives of their localities. Citizens who themselves used ICTs to influence government also provided their experiences and perspectives on the usefulness of ICTs and their idea of e-government in the future. Attendees participated in discussion and workshop sessions and identified common issues and opportunities for research-practice collaborations.

The symposium complemented the paper sessions of the HICSS E-Government Track.

HICSS44Koloa, Kaui 2011

9 Minitracks

Organziers/Proposers: Bjoern Niehaves, Theresa A. Pardo, Akemi T. Chatfield, Karine Barzilai-Nahon, Scott Robertson, John C. Bertot, Jay Kesan, Suha AlAwadhi, Peter Parycek, Jim Davies, Ralf Klischewski, Tomasz Janowski, J. Ramon Gil-Garcia, Maddalena Sorrentino, Miriam Lips, Yannis Charalabidis, Marijn Janssen, Olivier Glassey, Rowena Cullen, Frank Bannister, Kenneth R. Fleischmann, Gregory B. White, Wm. Arthur Conklin, Barbara Endicott-Popovsky, Lemuria Carter, Jing Zhang, L Christian Schaupp, and Hans Jochen Scholl.

The best paper award 2011 went to Karine Nahon and Jeff Hemsley for their paper entitled "Democracy.com: A Tale of Political Blogs and Content"

Thirty nine papers in 12 sessions were accepted
Symposium 21ST Century Government and Governance: Crossing Boundaries (full-day)

Committee: Scott Robertson, Akemi Chatfield, Niko Kroustalias, John Bertot, Theresa Pardo, Marjin Janssen, and Jochen Scholl

The purpose of this full-day symposium is to engage the community of international e- Government/Digital Government scholars and practitioners in an exchange of mutually interesting research topics. This year the symposium reaches across disciplines to highlight novel research approaches and methods focusing on e-Government.

The symposium comprises two parts: 1) The first part presents recently published meritorious and groundbreaking papers on e-Government research topics from conferences or journals in disciplines not specifically focused on eGovernment (e.g. social networking, public policy, security, etc.). Authors will expand on their previous research and discuss novel methodologies. 2) The second part includes a workshop on novel research methods to help participants explore how new approaches might be useful in their own research. The symposium complements the paper sessions of the HICSS E-Government Track.

HICSS43Koloa, Kauai 2010

8 Minitracks

Organziers/Proposers: Tomasz Janowski, Jim Davies, Ralf Klischewski, Theresa A. Pardo, Karine Barzilai-Nahon, Bjoern Niehaves, Lawrence E. Brandt, Scott Robertson, Thomas Horan, Ahmed Imran, Rowena Cullen, Jay Kesan, Frank Bannister, Jing Zhang, Petra Wolf, Lemuria Carter, Gregory B. White, Wm. Arthur Conklin, Marijn Janssen, Yannis Charalabidis, Apitep Saekow, Helmut Krcmar, J. Ramon Gil-Garcia, Maddalena Sorrentino, and Hans J. Scholl.

The best paper award 2010 went to Christopher Hecker and Brian Hay for their paper entitled "Securing E-Government Assets Through Automating Deployment of Honeynets for IDS Support"

Thirty nine papers in 11 sessions were accepted
Symposium Global Electronic Government Research and Practice Community Symposium

Committee: John Bertot, Nitesh Bharosa, Yannis Charalbidis, Tomasz Janowski, Marijn Janssen, Theresa Pardo, Scott Robertson, and Hans J. Scholl

The aim of this symposium is three-fold:

  1. To present the progress in Electronic Government research during 2009 as seen through the outputs of major conferences and journals in the area,
  2. To examine how research challenges identified during HICCS-42 have been addressed in 2009, and
  3. To define a new set of challenges towards HICCS-44.

The full day symposium will bring together members of the global research and practice community on Electronic Government, providing a sense of direction to community-wide research efforts and focusing such efforts upon major challenges and problems of practical importance.

We are dedicating this symposium to the memory of Valerie Gregg, co-founder of the Symposium, long-time Program Manager for the Digital Government Research at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), and Government Fellow at the Center for Technology in Government, University of Albany, State University of New York. Valerie was a tireless and passionate champion of the Global Electronic Government Research and Practice Community. Her departure is a profound loss to our community.

The symposium comprises seven main parts:

  1. OPENING � Setting the scene for the symposium, defining its rationale, aim and structure.
  2. REMEMBERING � Valerie Gregg
  3. SESSION 1 � Providing best examples of Electronic Government research in 2009 through the presentations of meritorious papers from selected conferences and journals by their authors.
  4. SESSION 2 � Presenting major directions and critical lessons learnt from Electronic Government research, observed during 2009 through selected conferences and journals by their Program Committee or Editorial Board Chairs, with presentations in Session 1 serving as concrete examples.
  5. SESSION 3 � Summarizing the challenges identified through the Electronic Government Strategy Workshop at HICCS-42 and examining if and how such challenges have been addressed during 2009, taking into account the examples and overviews presented during Sessions 1 and 2. What research gaps can be observed in view of the challenge-research analysis?
  6. SESSION 4 � Carrying out the Electronic Government Strategy Workshop, in view of the newly emerging needs, evolving context for research applications in the area, and challenge-research gaps identified during Session 3, identifying or re-emphasizing research challenges for 2010. How to promote research in critical understudied areas towards HICSS-44, and beyond?
  7. CLOSING � Summarizing what has been achieved by the symposium, capturing the state of the Global Electronic Government Research and Practice Community emerging from the different sessions, identifying the measures to further strengthen the community in 2010, and receiving ideas and expressions of interest to organize the next symposium during HICSS-44.

HICSS42Waikoloa, Big Island 2009

8 Minitracks
  • Development Methods for Electronic Government
  • Emerging Topics
  • E-Participation, e-Citizenship, and Digital Democracy
  • E-Policy, e-Governance, Ethics, and Law
  • E-Services and Information
  • Information Security
  • Infrastructure and Interoperability
  • Organization and Management

Organziers/Proposers: Tomasz Janowski, Ralf Klischewski, Theresa A. Pardo, Karine Barzilai-Nahon, Lawrence E. Brandt, Bjoern Niehaves, Wm. Arthur Conklin, Gregory B. White, Marijn Janssen, Soon Ae Chun, George Kuk, Helmut Krcmar, J. Ramon Gil-Garcia, Maddalena Sorrentino, Jing Zhang, Petra Wolf, Zhang Pengzhu, Rowena Cullen, Jay Kesan, Lemuria Carter, Scott Robertson, Sara Erikson, Thomas A. Horan, and Hans J. Scholl.

The best paper award 2009 went to Lei Zheng, Tung-Mou Yang, Theresa Pardo, and Yuanfu Jiang for their paper entitled "Understanding the "Boundary" in Information Sharing and Integration"

Thirty four papers in 11 sessions were accepted
Symposium Global Electronic Government Research and Practice Community (full-day)

Committee: Valerie Gregg, Tomasz Janowski, Marijn Janssen, Bjorn Niehaves, Scott Robertson, and Jochen Scholl

The purpose of this full-day symposium is to engage the community of international e-Government/Digital Government scholars and practitioners in an exchange of mutually interesting research topics. The symposium comprises two parts: First, it presents the meritorious groundbreaking papers in e-Government research published in 2008. Second, the symposium includes a strategic planning workshop to explore 'grand challenges' in E-government research and practice. The symposium complements the paper sessions of the HICSS E-Government Track.

HICSS41Waikoloa, Big Island 2008

Seven Minitracks
  • e-Gov Emerging Topics
  • e-Democracy
  • e-Gov Infrastructure
  • e-Gov Services
  • e-Gov Information Security
  • e-Policy, Law, & Governance

Organziers/Proposers: Suzanne Beaumaster, Lawrence E. Brandt, Wm. Arthur Conklin, Anthony M. Cresswell, Sharon S. Dawes, Haluk Demirkan, Sara Eriksen, Enrico Ferro, Marijn Janssen, Ralf Klischewski, Helmut Krcmar, Christine Leitner, Theresa A. Pardo, Keith A. Schildt, Jochen Scholl, Stuart W. Shulman, Maddalena Sorrentino, Eric W. Welch, Gregory B. White, Maria A. Wimmer, David Wolber, Jing Zhang

The best paper award 2008 went to Rajiv Shah Jay P. Kesan for their paper entitled " Information Privacy and Trust in Government"
The runner-up with an honorable mention was the paper entitled "An Activity-Based Approach towards Development and Use of E-Government Service Ontologies" by Ralf Klischewskiand Stefan Ukena.

Thirty one papers in 11 sessions were accepted
Symposium Second Full-day Symposium of the Global Electronic Government Research and Practice Community

Committee: Valerie Gregg (Lead), Marijn Janssen, Tomasz Janowski, Theresa Pardo, Jochen Scholl, and Maria Wimmer

Annual meritorious and community-invited papers presented at the symposium were

“Governing with Information Technologies” by Rajiv Shah and Jay Kesan (dgo2007)

“Automatic Generation of Data Processing Workflows for Transportation Modeling” by Jose Luis Ambite and Dipsy Kapoor (dgo2007)

“Antecedents of Corruption and the Role of E-Government Systems in Developing Countries” by Rahul De, Indian Institute of Management (DEXA/E-Gov2007)

“Multiple Measures of Website Effectiveness and Their Association with Service Quality in Health and Human Services” by Eric W. Welch and Sanjay Pandey (HICSS 40)

“Innovation Processes in the Public Sector: New Vistas for an Interdisciplinary Perspective on eGovernment Research?” Bjorn Niehaves, ERCIS/University of Munster (DEXA/E-Gov2007)

"Central Research Questions in E-Government Research" by Jochen Scholl published in the journal Transforming Government: Policies, Practices and People, Volume 1, Issue 1 (2007)

HICSS40Waikoloa, Big Island 2007

Eight Minitracks
  • e-Gov Emerging Topics
  • e-Democracy
  • e-Gov Infrastructure
  • e-Gov Management
  • e-Gov KM & IM,
  • e-Gov Services
  • e-Gov Information Security
  • e-Policy, Law, & Governance
Organziers/Proposers: Kim V Andersen, Suzanne Beaumaster, Anthony Cresswell, Haluk Demirkan, Kristin Eschenfelder, Michael Goul, Thomas Horan, Marijn Janssen, Stephen Jones, Ralf Klischewski, Robert Krimmer, Christine Leitner, Ann Mactintosh, Jeremy Millard, Theresa Pardo, Keith Schildt, Jochen Scholl, Pirkko Walden, Eric Welch, Gregory White, Maria Wimmer, and Jing Zhang

The best paper award 2007 went to Eric.W. Welch and Sanjay Pandeys paper entitled "Multiple Measures of Website Effectiveness and their Effect on Service Quality in Health and Human Service Agencies." The runner-up with an honorable mention was the paper entitled " Information Privacy and Trust in Government" co-authored by Rowena Cullen and Patrick Reilly.

Thirty five papers in 11 sessions were accepted
Symposium First Full-day Symposium of the Global Electronic Government Research and Practice Community

Committee: Valerie Gregg (Lead), Sharon Dawes, Theresa Pardo, Marijn Janssen, Jochen Scholl, and Maria Wimmer

HICSS39Koloa, Kauai 2006

Seven Minitracks
  • e-Gov Emerging Topics
  • e-Democracy
  • e-Gov Infrastructure
  • e-Gov Management
  • e-Gov Services
  • e-Gov Security
  • e-Policy, Law, & Governance
Organziers/Proposers: Kim V Andersen, Suzanne Beaumaster, Heide Bruecher, Anthony Cresswell, Kristin Eschenfelder, Ake Grönlund, Ray Hackney, Marijn Janssen, Stephen Jones, Ralf Klischewski, Helmut Krcmar, Robert Krimmer, Herbert Kubicek, Ann Mactintosh, Terrence Maxwell, M. Jae Moon, Don Norris, Theresa Pardo, Jochen Scholl, Eric Welch, Gregory White, and Maria Wimmer

E-Government assumes full track status at HICSS.

Thirty seven papers in 12 sessions were accepted

HICSS38Waikoloa, Big Island 2005

Five Minitracks
  • e-Democracy
  • e-Gov Infrastructure
  • e-Gov Management
  • e-Gov Services
  • e-Policy, Law, & Governance

Organziers/Proposers: Heide Bruecher, Anthony Cresswell, Jon Gant, Michael Gisler, Marijn Janssen, Ralf Klischewski, Helmut Krcmar, Robert Krimmer, Ann Mactintosh, Terrence Maxwell, M. Jae Moon, Theresa Pardo, Jochen Scholl, Eric Welch, and Maria Wimmer

Thirty six papers in 10 sessions were accepted

HICSS37Waikoloa, Big Island 2004

Four Minitracks
  • e-Gov Management
  • e-Policy
  • e-Democracy
  • e-Gov Services

Organziers/Proposers: Heide Bruecher, Anthony Cresswell, Sharon Dawes, Jon Gant, Michael Gisler, Matthias Günter, Marijn Janssen, Ralf Klischewski, Robert Krimmer, Theresa Pardo, Jochen Scholl, and Eric Welch

Twenty five papers in 8 sessions were accepted

HICSS36Waikoloa, Big Island 2003

Four Minitracks
  • e-Government Management
  • e-Policy
  • e-Democracy
  • e-Gov Services
Organizers/Proposers: Bettina von Bredow, Heide Bruecher, Anthony Cresswell, Sharon Dawes, Jon Gant, Micheal Gisler, Matthias Günter, Ralf Klischewski, Theresa Pardo, Jochen Scholl, Eric Welch, and Maria Wimmer

E-Government becomes a cluster within the Emerging Technologies Track

Twenty six papers in 8 sessions were accepted

HICSS35Waikoloa, Big Island 2002

Two Minitracks
  • e-Government
  • e-Policy

Organzers/Proposers: Anthony Cresswell, Sharon Dawes, Michael Gisler, Matthias Günter, Theresa Pardo, Jochen Scholl, and Dieter Spahni

Thirteen papers in 4 sessions were accepted

HICSS34Wailea, Maui 2001

First Minitrack on e-Government

Organizers/Proposers Michael Gisler, Matthias Günter, and Dieter Spahni

 

Please note that some slides carry an incorrect date tag (1999 instead of 2001)

Six papers in two sessions were accepted