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Publications

 

Publications page.



Publications by David Catling


BOOKS:

Astrobiology VSI book cover
1) For the general public:

David C. Catling (2013) Astrobiology: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press.

Questions & Answers about astrobiology & the book.

Guest blog @Oxford University Press: "Astrobiology: Pouring Cold Asteroid Water on Aristotle"

Reading Guide: Questions for Thought and Discussion for Astrobiology: A Very Short Introduction.






2) Along with
Prof. Jim Kasting from Penn State University, I'm writing the following technical book, aimed at graduate students and researchers:

D. C. Catling and J. F. Kasting, Atmospheric Evolution on Inhabited and Lifeless Worlds, Cambridge University Press, nearly finished, coming soon!, 2014/2015.

Articles by most cited: See David Catling Google Scholar Page
Article analysis by subject, coauthor, etc.:  David Catling SciVal Expert Page

ARTICLES:
2014

101. S. M. Som, R. Buick, J. W. Hagadorn, T. S. Blake, J. M. Perreault, J. P. Harnmeijer, D. C. Catling, [a manuscript about the early Earth's atmosphere], ready for submission, 2014.

100. G. M. Marion, D. C. Catling, J. K. Crowley, J. S. Kargel, Modeling calcium sulfate chemistries with application to Mars, in prep., 2014.

99. G. M. Marion, D. C. Catling, J. S. Kargel, J. I. Lunine, Modeling nitrogen-gas, -liquid, -solid chemistries at low temperature (173-298 K), in prep., 2014.

98. E. E. Stüeken, R. Buick, A. D. Anbar, D. C. Catling. Selenium in the latest Archean: A longer whiff but no MIF, submitted, 2014.

97. D. C. Catling, Planetary Atmospheres. In G. Schubert (ed.), Treatise on Geophysics (2nd Ed.), vol. 10, Elsevier, submitted for review, 2014.
            A  review of essentials of planetary atmospheres--mainly physics with some chemistry.

96. D. C. Catling. Mars Atmosphere: History and Surface Interactions. In: T. Spohn,  T. V. Johnson, D. Breuer (eds.), Encyclopedia of the Solar System (3rd Edition), Academic Press, in press, 2014.

96. D. C. Catling, The Great Oxidation Event Transition, In Treatise on Geochemistry (5nd. Ed.), edited by H. D. Holland and K. K. Turekian, vol. 6, Elsevier, Oxford, 177-195, 2014. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-08-095975-7.01307-3  [E-print].

94. J. D. Toner, D. C. Catling, B. Light, Reanalysis of Wet Chemistry Laboratory data at the Phoenix Lander site on Mars with implications for the soluble soil salts, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, doi:10.1016/j.gca.2014.03.030, 2014, in press.

93. M. L. Smith, M. W. Claire, D. C. Catling, K. J. Zahnle, The formation of sulfate, nitrate and perchlorate salts in the martian atmosphere,  Icarus, 231, 51-64, 2014. Open Access full article
Using a photochemical simulation, we calculate deposition fluxes of salts formed in the ancient martian atmosphere by oxidation of volcanic gases. The resulting sulfate soil concentrations are consistent with observations. Results also show that pernitric acid forms predominantly in Mars' atmosphere rather than nitric acid. Purely gas-phase reactions are insufficient to account for perchlorate in the soil so that gas-solid reactions (which are currently unknown) are implied.

92. T. D. Robinson & D. C. Catling, Common 0.1 bar tropopause in thick atmospheres set by pressure-dependent infrared transparency, Nature Geoscience,  7, 12-15, 2014. doi:10.1038/NGEO2020 [E-print].
The minimum air temperature between the troposphere (the lowest atmospheric layer where temperature declines with altitude) and stratosphere (where temperature increases with altitude in an 'inversion') occurs a pressure of about 0.1 bar on Earth, Titan, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. We used the physics of radiation to explain why the tropopause temperature minimum in these very different atmospheres occurs at the common pressure near 0.1 bar. Physics suggests that a tropopause temperature minimum around 0.1 bar should be a fairly general rule for planets with stratospheric temperature inversions. This rule could constrain the atmospheric structure on exoplanets and hence their surface temperature and habitability. Accompanying Univ. of Washington news story.

91. J. D. Toner, D. C. Catling, B. Light, The formation of supercooled brines, viscous liquids, and low-temperature glasses on Mars, Icarus 233, 36-47, 2014, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2014.01.018. [E-print].
We report a discovery that perchlorate salts tend not to crystallize if cooled even at relatively slow rates but become gradually more viscous and turn into glass (amorphous, non-crystalline solids). Glasses are great for preserving microorganisms, so this is relevant for looking for signs of microbial life on Mars and other cold bodies.


90. D. C. Catling & K. J. Zahnle. How impact delivery and erosion control the existence of     planetary atmospheres, in preparation, 2014.
A presentation outlining this topic was submitted to the 2013 Lunar & Planetary Sci. Conference, along with a related presentation called "The Cosmic Shoreline".

89. E. E. Stüeken, J. Foriel, B. K. Nelson, R. Buick, D. C. Catling. Perturbation in marine selenium isotopes across the Permian-Triassic boundary driven by redox and productivity changes, in revision, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2014.

88. D. C. Catling, C. B. Leovy, S. E. Wood, M. D. Day. Does the Vastitas Borealis Formation contain oceanic or volcanic  deposits?:  Subsurface sampling using small craters, in preparation, 2014.
In this paper, we discuss evidence that Vastitas Borealis Formation contains a significant fraction of basaltic debris so that a giant sea of lava once existed in the northern lowlands of Mars.

87. R. M. Haberle, D. C. Catling, M. H. Carr, K. J. Zahnle . Early Mars, in  The Atmosphere and Climate of Mars (Eds. R. M. Haberle et al.), Cambridge Univ. Press, 2014, in press.

86. D. C. Catling & D. Bergsman, On detecting biospheres from chemical disequilibrium in planetary atmospheres, in preparation, 2013.
An earlier conference abstract on this topic was presented here. (D. C. Catling & D. Bergsman,  Astrobio. Sci. Conf. 5533, 2010).

85. P. Pogge von Strandmann, C. D. Coath, D. C. Catling, S. W. Poulton, T. Elliott, Analysis of mass dependent and mass independent selenium isotope variability in black shales, in revision, 2014.

84. K. J. Zahnle & D. C. Catling, Waiting for oxygen, in Special Paper 504: Earth's Early Atmosphere and Surface Environment (Shaw, G. H., ed.), Geological Society of America Conference Proceedings, 2014, in press.

2013

83. Marion, G. M., Kargel, J. S., Crowley, J. K., Catling, D. C., Sulfite-sulfide-sulfate- carbonate equilibria with applications to Mars, Icarus, 225, 342-351, 2013. [E-print].

82. S. M. Som, J. W. Hagadorn, W. A. Thelen, A. R. Gillespie, D. C. Catling, R. Buick, Quantitative discrimination between geological materials with low density contrast by high resolution X-ray computer tomography: An example using amygdule size-distribution in ancient lava flows, Computers & Geosciences, 54, 231-238, 2013, doi: 10.1016/j.cageo.2012.11.019 .[E-print].

81. P. B. Niles, D. C. Catling, G. Berger, E. Chassefiere, B. L. Ehlmann, J. Michalski, R, Morris, S. W. Ruff, B. Sutter, Carbonates on Mars, Space Science Reviews, 174, 301-328, 2013. [E-print].

80. B. L. Ehlmann et al. (incl. D. C. Catling), Geochemical consequences of widespread clay mineral formation in Mars' ancient crust, Space Science Reviews, 174, 329-364, 2013.
[E-print].

79. E. E. Stüeken, J. Foriel, B. K. Nelson, R. Buick, D. C. Catling. Selenium isotope analysis of organic-rich shales: Advances in sample preparation and isobaric interference correction, J. Analytical Atomic Spectroscopy, doi:10.1039/C3JA50186H, 2013.

78. K. J. Zahnle, D. C. Catling,  M. W. Claire. The rise of oxygen and the hydrogen hourglass (Open Access), Chemical Geology, in press, 2013.

77. D. C. Catling, S. Stroud. The greening of Green Mountain, Ascension Island, submitted for M. Joachim, M. Silver (eds.) Post-Sustainable: New Directions in Ecological Design, Metropolis Books, New York City, in press, 2013. [preprint]

76. D. C. Catling. How long will the Earth remain habitable? Sky & Telescope Special Edition: Astronomy's 60 Greatest Mysteries, 2013, p.16-17.

2012
75. E. E. Stüeken, D. C. Catling, R. Buick, Contributions to Late Archaean sulphur cycling by life on land, Nature Geoscience, 5, 722-725, doi:10.1038/ngeo1585, 2012. Accompanying University of Washington News Story. [E-print]

74. T. D. Robinson & D. C. Catling, An analytic radiative-convective model for planetary atmospheres, Astrophysical Journal, 757, 104. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/757/1/104. [E-print] We believe in unselfish cooperation in research, so IDL (Interactive Data Language) source code used in this paper is available to everyone here:
        AN_RC_MOD.pro , EXAMPLE.pro, EXAMPLE_W_FLUXES.pro

73. J. F. Kasting, D. C. Catling, K. J. Zahnle, Atmospheric oxygenation and volcanism, Nature 487, E1, 2012.

72. E. Sefton-Nash, D. C. Catling, S. E. Wood, P. Grindrod, Topographic, spectral and thermal inertia analysis of interior layered deposits in Iani Chaos, Mars,  Icarus, 221, 20-42, 2012. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2012.06.036  [E-print]

71. S. M. Som, D. C. Catling, J. P. Harnmeijer, P. M. Polivka, R. Buick. Air density 2.7 billion years ago limited to less than twice modern levels by fossil raindrop imprints, Nature, 484, 359-362, 2012.  doi:10.1038/nature10890
- We use fossil raindrop impressions in 2.7 billion-year-old rocks made of volcanic ash to determine an upper limit on the air density and hence the barometric pressure at that time. The method use calibration experiments of drops falling into modern, comparable ash. This is the first time constraints on the barometric pressure on the early Earth have been made using direct physical geology. Air pressure was probably less than 52-110% of today's value. (University of Washington Press Release ).

70. M. W. Claire, J. Sheets, M. Cohen, I. Ribas, D.C. Catling, The evolution of solar flux from 2 nm to 160 microns: Quantitative estimates for planetary studies, Astrophysical Journal 757, 95, 2012. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/757/1/95 [E-print]

69. G. M. Marion, J. S. Kargel, D. C. Catling, J. I Lunine, Modeling ammonia-ammonium chemistries in the outer planet regions, Icarus 220, 932-946, 2012. [E-print]

2011


68. D. Schulze-Makuch et al. (inc. D. C. Catling). A two-tiered approach to assessing the habitability of exoplanets, Astrobiology, 11,  doi:10.1089/ast.2010.0592, 2011.
- In the future, thousands of exoplanets will be known, so how will we judge whether they might be habitable from basic astronomical parameters? This paper presents some metrics and considerations of what makes a planet habitable.

67. D. C. Catling. Oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere. In Encyclopedia of Astrobiology (Eds. M. Gargaud et al.),  Springer, 1200-1208, 2011. [E-print]

66. G. M. Marion, D. C. Catling, J K. Crowley, J. S. Kargel. Modeling hot spring chemistries with applications to Martian silica formation, Icarus, 212, 629-642 doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2011.01.035. [E-print]

65. K. J. Zahnle, R. S. Freedman, D. C. Catling. Is there methane on Mars?, Icarus, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2010.11.027, 2011.
- We argue that reports of rapidly-varying methane on Mars (which has led to much speculation about biogenic sources) violate basic principles of redox chemistry.  This led us to uncover hitherto undocumented interferences in the observations, which cast doubt on the robustness of the data. [E-print]

2010

64. P. Withers. D. C. Catling.  Observations of atmospheric tides on Mars at the season and latitude of the Phoenix atmospheric entry, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L24204, doi:10.1029/2010GL045382, 2010.
- The first in situ atmospheric structure from the polar regions of Mars. We report on the atmospheric structure that we derive from accelerometer data obtained during the descent of the Phoenix Lander to the surface of Mars in 2008.  The temperature profile of the atmosphere was strongly influenced by thermal tides, i.e., global oscillations caused by day-night heating of the atmosphere by the Sun that are also influenced by the global-scale topography of Mars. [E-print]

63. F. Tian, M. W. Claire, J. D. Haqq-Misra, M. Smith, D. C. Crisp, D. Catling, K. Zahnle, J. F. Kasting. Photochemical and climate consequences of sulfur outgassing on early Mars, Earth  Planet. Sci. Lett., 295, 412-418 , 2010. [E-print]
- We show that the net effect of volcanic sulfur gases on early Mars was to cool the planet because of the formation of reflective sulfate aerosols. That this is so should be intuitive because sulfate aerosols cool Earth and Venus by reflecting sunlight. However,  papers previously published by others had argued that SO2 gas would keep early Mars "warm and wet". Although SO2 is a greenhouse gas, prior studies did not account for the larger cooling effect of sulfate aerosols.

62. S. P. Kounaves, M. H. Hecht, J. Kapit, R. C. Quinn, D.C. Catling, B. C. Clark, D. W. Ming, et al., Soluble sulfate in the Martian soil at the Phoenix landing site, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L09201, 2010. doi:10.1029/2010GL042613
- The first measurement of the amount of soluble sulfate in the soil on Mars

61. S. P. Kounaves, S. T. Stroble, R. M. Anderson, Q. Moore, D. C. Catling, S. Douglas,
C. P. McKay, D. W. Ming, P. H. Smith, L. K. Tamppari, A. P. Zent, Discovery of natural perchlorate in the Antarctic Dry Valleys and its global implications, Environmental Science and Technology, DOI: 10.1021/es9033606, 2010.
 - The first detection of perchlorate (ClO4-) salts in the Antarctic Dry Valleys.

60. G. M. Marion, D. C. Catling, M. W. Claire, K. J. Zahnle. Modeling aqueous perchlorate chemistries with applications to Mars, Icarus, 207, 675-685, 2010. [E-print]

59.   D. C. Catling, M. W. Claire, K. J. Zahnle, et al.,  Atmospheric origins of perchlorate on Mars and in the Atacama, J. Geophys. Res., 115, E00E11, doi:10.1029/2009JE003425, 2010. See First Results From the Phoenix Mission to Mars Special Issue. [E-print]
- The first photochemical model to calculate fluxes of atmospheric salts that bulit up the salt deposits (nitrate and perchlorate) in the Atacama desert of Chile. Also, we discuss chemical pathways to form perchlorate on Mars.

58. S. P. Kounaves et al. (incl. D. C. Catling),  The wet chemistry experiments on the 2007 Phoenix Mars Scout Lander Mission: Data analysis and results, J. Geophys. Res., 115, E00E10, doi:10.1029/2009JE003424, 2010.
              - The first direct measurement of soluble soil salts on Mars made by adding soil on                 Mars to water and measuring anions and cations with ion selective electrodes.

57. D. Fisher et al. (incl. D. C. Catling), A perchlorate-lubricated brine deformable bed could facilitate flow of the Mars North Polar Cap: Possible mechanism for water table recharging, J. Geophys. Res., 115, E00E12, doi:10.1029/2009JE003405, 2010.

56. C. Stoker, A. Zent, D. C. Catling et al., Habitability of the Phoenix Landing Site, J. Geophys. Res., 115, E00E20, 2010. doi:10.1029/2009JE003421.


2009


55. Renno, N. O., B. J. Boss, D. Catling, et al., Possible physical and thermodynamical evidence for liquid water at the Phoenix landing site, J. Geophys. Res., 114, E00E03, doi:10.1029/2009JE003362, 2009.

54. Smith, P. H., L. Tamppari, R. E. D. Arvidson, D. S. Bass, D. Blaney, W. V. Boynton, A. Carswell, D. C. Catling et al., H2O at the Phoenix landing siteScience, 325, 58-61, 2009.

53. M. H. Hecht et al. (incl. D. C. Catling), Detection of perchlorate and soluble chemistry of  martian soil: Findings from the Phoenix Mars Lander, Science, 325, 64-67, 2009.

52. W. V. Boynton et al. (incl. D. C. Catling), Evidence for calcium carbonate at the Phoenix landing site, Science, 325, 61-64, 2009.

51. D. C. Catling and K. J. Zahnle, The escape of planetary atmospheres, Scientific American, 300, 36-43, May 2009. [E-print]

50.  G. M.  Marion, J. S. Kargel and D. C. Catling. Br/Cl partitioning in chloride minerals in the Burns Formation on Mars, Icarus, 200, 436-445, 2009.

49. D. C. Catling, Atmospheric Evolution of Mars. In: V. Gornitz (ed.) Encyclopedia of Paleoclimatology and Ancient Environments, Springer, Dordrecht, 2009, pp.  66-75, [preprint]

In celebration of  the bicentennial of Charles Darwin's birth in February 1809:
48. D. C. Catling, Revisiting Darwin's Voyage, in Darwin: For the Love of Science, A. Kelly, M. Kelly, B. Dolan, J. Hodge, M. Waithe, A. C. Grayling, K.  Ward, G. Dyson, and D. C. Catling. Bristol Cultural Development Partnership, 2009, pp. 240-251. [preprint] [E-print]

2008
47. Smith, P. H., L. Tamppari, R. E. D. Arvidson, D. S. Bass, D. Blaney, W. V. Boynton, A. Carswell, D. C. Catling et al., The Phoenix mission to Mars, J. Geophys. Res., 13, E00A18,  doi:10.1029/2008JE003083.

46.  P. A. Taylor, D. C. Catling, M. Daly, C. S. Dickinson, H. O. Gunnlaugsson, A-M. Harri, C. F. Lange, Temperature, pressure and wind instrumentation on the Phoenix meteorological package, J. Geophys. Res., 113, EA0A10, doi:10.1029/2007JE003015, 2008. [E-print]

45.  G. M.  Marion, J. S. Kargel and D. C. Catling. Modeling ferrous-ferric iron chemistry with application to Martian surface geochemistry, Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 72, 242-266, 2008. [E-print]

44. D. C. Catling. Where did the oxygen in our atmosphere come from? In: The Seventy Great Mysteries of the Natural World, M. J. Benton (Ed.), Thames and Hudson, London, pp.69-71, 2008. [E-print]

43. E. Sefton-Nash and D. C. Catling. Hematitic concretions at Meridiani Planum, Mars: Their growth timescale and possible relationship with iron sulfates, Earth Plan. Sci. Lett.,  269, 366-376, 2008. [E-print]

42. K. J. Zahnle, R. M Haberle, D. C. Catling, J. F. Kasting. Photochemical instability of the ancient Martian atmosphere, J. Geophys. Res, 113, E11004, doi:10.1029/2008JE003160, 2008.

41.  D. C. Catling. Earth's early atmosphere, Catalyst: Secondary Science Review, 18, 16-18, 2008.  (an article aimed at secondary school students) [E-print]

2007
40. D. C. Catling, Mars: Ancient fingerprints in the clay, Nature 448, 31-32, 2007. [E-print] 
    39. D. C. Catling, M. W. Claire, and K. J. Zahnle, Anaerobic methanotrophy and the rise of oxygen, Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. A 365, 1867-1888, 2007. [E-print] 
38. D. C. Catling and J. F. Kasting, Planetary Atmospheres and Life, In W. Sullivan , J. Baross (eds.) Planets and Life: The Emerging Science of Astrobiology, Cambridge University Press,  p. 91-116, 2007. [E-print]
 
37. D. Catling, Book Review, Genesis: The Scientific Quest for Life's Origins by Robert M. Hazen,  American Mineralogist 92, 1543, 2007. [E-print]

2006

36. D. C. Catling, and R. Buick. Introduction to Special Issue: Oxygen and Life in the Precambrian, Geobiology, vol. 4, 225-226, 2006. [E-print]
35. K. J. Zahnle, M. W. Claire, and D.C. Catling, The loss of mass-independent fractionation in sulfur due to a Paleoproterozoic collapse of atmospheric methane, Geobiology, vol. 4, 271-283, 2006. [E-print]
    • A 1D numerical photochemical model is used to study the atmospheric photochemistry of oxygen, methane, and sulphur after the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis. We show that collapse of atmospheric methane in the early Proterozoic aeon to levels of  ~10s of ppmv provides the best explanation of the disappearance of mass-independent fractionation in sulphur isotopes.
34. M. W. Claire, D.C. Catling and K. J. Zahnle, Biogeochemical modeling of the rise in atmospheric oxygen. Geobiology, vol. 4, 239-269, 2006. [E-print]
    • Here we present analytical and numerical computations for how the Earth's early atmosphere transitioned to an O2-rich state about 2.4. billion years ago. Understanding this transition is important for life on Earth because the rise of O2 allowed a stratospheric ozone layer to develop and allowed a greater variety of oxygen-dependent eukaryotic life.
33. Mix, L., et al., The astrobiology primer: An outline of general knowledge - Version 1, 2006. Astrobiology 6,  735-813, 2006.

32. Marion G. M., Catling D. C., Kargel J. S., Modeling gas hydrate equilibria in electrolyte solutions. CALPHAD - Computer Coupling of Phase Diagrams and Thermochemistry, 30, 248-259, 2006.

31. G. T. Delory, W. M. Farrell, S. Atreya, N. O. Renno, A-S. Wong, S. A. Cummer, D. D. Sentman, J. R. Marshall, S. C. R. Rafkin and D. C. Catling, Oxidant enhancement in Martian dust devils and storms: Storm electric fields and electron dissociative attachment. Astrobiology 6, 453-454, 2006.
30. S. K. Atreya, A-S Wong, N. O. Renno, W. M. Farrell, G. T. Delory, D. D. Sentman, S. A. Cummer, J. R. Marshall, S. C. R. Rafkin, D. C. Catling, Oxidant enhancement in Martian dust devils and storms: Implications for life and habitability, Astrobiology, 6, 439-450, 2006.
29. D.C. Catling, Comment on "A Hydrogen-rich Early Earth Atmosphere". Science 311, 38a, 2006.
    • Here I commented on a paper by Tian et al., noting that Earth's early thermosphere, under the high extreme ultraviolet flux of the early Sun, would have been hot enough for hydrogen to escape readily so that hydrogen would not accumulate to high abundance. My back-of-envelope calculations are supported by independent detailed calculations of early Earth's thermosphere by Kulikov et al. (2006) Space Sci. Rev., submitted. 
28. D.C. Catling, S. E. Wood, C. Leovy, D. R. Montgomery, H. Greenberg, C. R. Glein, J. M. Moore, Light-toned layered deposits in Juventae Chasma, Mars, Icarus, 181, 26-51, 2006.[E-print]
    • This paper discusses the origin of enigmatic sulfate deposits, as large as mountains, in a deep chasm on Mars.
27. D. C. Catling, C. Leovy, Mars Atmosphere: History and Surface Interactions. In: L. McFadden, P. Weissman (eds.) Encyclopedia of the Solar System, Academic Press, 2006, p.301-314. [preprint]  [E-print]
2005

26. D. C. Catling and M. Claire, How Earth's atmosphere evolved to an oxic state: A status report, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 237, 1-20, 2005. [E-print]
    • A review of the how the level of dioxygen in the Earth's atmosphere has changed over the last 4 billion years and what caused the changes, to the best of our knowledge.
25. D C. Catling, Twin studies on Mars. Nature 436, 42-43, 2005. [E-print]
    • Commentary on Mars rover results.
24. D. W. Beaty, S. M. Clifford, L. E. Borg, D. Catling et al., Key science questions from the Second Conference on Early Mars: Geologic, hydrologic, climate evolution, and the implications for life, Astrobiology , 5, 663-689, 2005.
23. D. C. Catling, C.R. Glein, K.J. Zahnle, and C. P. McKay. Why O2 is required by complex life on habitable planets and the concept of planetary "oxygenation time",  Astrobiology, 5, 415-438, 2005. [E-print] Commentary on this paper by Norm Sleep.
    • In this paper, we explain how O2 provides the highest feasible energy release per electron transfer for carbon-based life, a universal property set by the limits of the periodic table. We also calculate theoretical biomass spectra for anaerobic (non-O2-using) life, which shows why such life does not grow large and complex. The upshot is that the evolution of water-splitting metabolism (photosynthesis) and subsequent atmospheric evolution are the important factors for determining the distribution of complex life on planets elsewhere in our galaxy and in the universe.
    • See also "Why E.T. would also breathe oxygen", Forbes Magazine.

22. D. C. Catling, Coupled evolution of Earth's atmosphere and biosphere. In: A. Kleidon, R. Lorenz (eds.) Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics and the Production of Entropy: Life, Earth and Beyond, Springer, 2005, p.191-206.
    • Of solar system planets with atmospheres, the Earth is the sunniest in terms of flux reaching its surface. Earth also has an anomalous atmosphere, chemically and dynamically. The chemistry is in a low entropy state, pushed far from thermodynamic equilibrium by surface gas fluxes. Dynamically, the Earth has the most unpredictable weather (e.g., compare Jupiter's Great Red Spot) and the slowest jets. In this paper, I discuss how life and entropy production have roles in producing Earth's weird atmosphere, which in turn allows life to flourish.
21. G. M. Marion, J. S. Kargel, D. C. Catling, S. D. Jakubowski. Effects of pressure on aqueous chemical equilibria at subzero temperatures with applications to Europa, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 69, 259-274, 2005.

2004
20. D. C. Catling, Planetary Science: On Earth, as it is on Mars? Nature 429, 707-708, 2004. [E-print]
    • A "News and Views" piece that gives recent thinking on Martian hematite concretions (nicknamed "blueberries") that were discovered by the Opportunity Mars rover. The write-up discusses similar (but different!) phenomena on Earth, in Utah.

19. W. M. Farrell, P. H. Smith, G. T. Delory, G. B. Hillard, J. R. Marshall, D. Catling et al., Electric and magnetic signatures of dust devils from the 2000-2001 MATADOR desert tests, J. Geophys. Res., 109(E), doi:10.1029/2003JE002088, 2004. [E-print] 
 18. D. C. Catling, M. W. Claire, K. J. Zahnle, Understanding the evolution of atmospheric redox state from the Archaean to the Proterozoic, In: Reimold, W.U. and Hofmann, A. (Eds.), Abstract volume, Field Forum on Processes on the Early Earth, Kaapvaal Craton, S. Africa, July 4-9, 2004, p.17-19.  [E-print] 
    • Here, we presented a quantitative model of the rise of oxygen around 2.4 billion years ago.  We showed how the rise of O2 occurred when the flux of organic carbon burial (which is the source of O2) exceeded the geothermal flux of reductants (such as reduced volcanic and metamorphic gases that react with oxygen, as well as hydrothermal cations such as ferrous iron). We also showed that as  O2 rises, ultraviolet shielding of the troposphere by ozone causes a positive feedback on the increase in atmospheric oxygen.  See the subsequent paper by Claire et al. (2006) for full details.

2003

17. D. M. Tratt, M. H. Hecht, D. C. Catling, E. C. Samulon, and P. Smith, In situ measurement of dust devil dynamics: Toward a strategy for Mars J. Geophys. Res., 108, doi:10.1029/2003JE002161, 2003. [E-print]
16. J. F. Kasting and D. C. Catling, Evolution of a habitable planet, Annual Reviews of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 41, 429-463, 2003.[E-print]
    • In this paper, we review why Earth's climate has remained conducive to life on Earth for the past 3.5 billion years.
15. D. C. Catling and J. M Moore, The nature of coarse-grained crystalline hematite and its implications for the early environment of Mars, Icarus, 165, 277-300, 2003.[E-print]
    • Gray, crystalline hematite is a mineral that has been found in certain locations on Mars, in particular at the landing site of the NASA Mars Exploration Rover called "Opportunity" that landed in 2004. In this paper, before we knew about the Opportunity findings, we discussed  the possible environments in which gray hematite might have formed on Mars.
14. G. M. Marion, D. C. Catling , and J. S. Kargel, Modeling aqueous ferrous iron chemistry at low temperatures with application to Mars, Geochem. Cosmochem. Acta, 67, 4251-4266, 2003. [E-print]

13 D. Catling and K. Zahnle, Evolution of atmospheric oxygen, in Encyclopedia of Atmospheric Sciences (Ed. J. Holton, J. Curry, J. Pyle), Academic Press, 754-761, 2003. [E-print]

2002

12. M. R. Patel, J. C. Zarnecki, and D. C. Catling, Ultraviolet radiation on the surface of Mars and the Beagle 2 ultraviolet sensor, Planetary and Space Science, 50, 915-927, 2002. [E-print]
2001
11. D. C. Catling, K. J. Zahnle, and C. P. McKay, Biogenic methane, hydrogen escape, and the irreversible oxidation of early Earth, Science, 293, 839-843, 2001. [E-print]
    • In this paper, we advanced a theory to answer the question of why the Earth's atmosphere became oxygen-rich about 2.4-2.2 billion years ago. This transition was an important event in Earth's history because all complex life forms (animals and multicellular plants) rely on molecular oxygen (O2). Consequently, understanding the rise of oxygen is critical for understanding biological evolution on our planet.

10.  J. C. Bridges, D. C. Catling, J. M. Saxton, T. D. Swindle, I. C. Lyon and M. M. Grady, Alteration assemblages in Martian meteorites: Implications for near-surface processes, in Chronology and Evolution of Mars , Kluwer Academic, New York, 2001, pp.365-392. [E-print]
2000

9. C. S., Cockell, D. C. Catling, W. L. Davis, K. Snook, R. L. Kepner, and P. Lee, and McKay, C. P., The ultraviolet environment of Mars: Biological implications past, present, and future. Icarus, 146, 343-459, 2000. [E-print]
8. J. K. Reynolds, D. Catling, R. C. Blue, N. I. Maluf, and T. Kenny, Packaging a piezoresistive pressure sensor to measure low absolute pressures over a wide sub-zero temperature range, Sensors and Actuators, A83, 142-149, 2000. [E-print]
1999
7. D. C. Catling. A chemical model for evaporites on early Mars: Possible sedimentary tracers of the early climate and implications for exploration, J. Geophys. Res., 104, 16,453-16,470, 1999. [E-print.]
6. S. Smrekar, D. Catling, R. Lorenz, J. Magalhaes, M. Meyer, J. Moersch, P. Morgan, J. Murphy, B. Murray, M. Presley-Holloway, A. Yen, and A. Zent, Deep Space 2: The Mars Microprobe Mission, J. Geophys. Res., 104, 27013-27030, 1999. [E-print]
5. C. S. Cockell, D. C. Catling and H. F. Waites. Insects at low-pressures: Applications to artificial ecosystems and implications for global windborne distribution, Life Support and Biosphere Sci., 6, 161-167, 1999.

prior to 1999

4. D. C. Catling. High sensitivity silicon capacitive sensors for measuring medium vacuum gas pressures, Sensors and Actuators, A64, 157-164, 1998. [E-print.]
3. R. M. Haberle and  D. C. Catling, A micro-meteorological mission for global network science on Mars: Rationale and measurement requirements, Planet. Space Sci. 44, 1361-1384, 1996. [E-print.]
    • This article was about a concept that Bob Haberle and I  came up with for measuring the global climate system on Mars using a network of miniature, automated weather stations. Later, along with other scientists and engineers, we developed a detailed NASA mission concept called "Pascal" to do this. Pascal is yet to fly, but such a mission will be an essential precursor for a future human mission. 
2. M. M. Joshi, S. R. Lewis, P. L. Read and D. C. Catling. Western boundary currents in the Martian atmosphere: Numerical simulations and observational evidence, J. Geophys. Res.  100, 5485-5500, 1995. [E-print.]
1. M. M. Joshi, S. R. Lewis, P. L. Read and D. C. Catling. Western boundary currents in the atmosphere of Mars, Nature, 367, 548-551, 1994.
    • Western boundary currents are important fluid flows  in the climate system on Earth. The Gulf Stream in the north Atlantic ocean helps keep western Europe warm and the East African Jet in the atmosphere plays an important role in the Asian monsoon. In this paper, we pointed out how western boundary currents are a significant feature of the atmosphere of Mars.[E-print.]


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