Almost Reaching the 5K Mark (DIRL v 6.0)

Version 6.0 of the Disaster Information Reference Library (DIRL) is the most recent update of this reference library. It has been published as of November 15, 2023 as a semiannual update. The library now contains 4,991references of predominantly English-language, peer-reviewed work in the study domains of disaster information and information technologies and their uses in the context of disasters. This represents an increase over the previous version of 285 references, or 6.1%.

The DIRL is becoming an indispensable tool for Disaster Information and Technology-interested scholars. In particular, peer reviewers of paper submissions may want to rely on this reference library.

Packaged in a zip file, bibTeXRIS as well as an Endnote package (enlp) versions are available. Mendeley or Zotero versions can easily be created by importing from RIS or bibTeX files. DIRL v 6.0 can be downloaded from the DIRL website.

Please get back to us in case of any errors or omissions. Thank you for your interest and cooperation.

Acknowledgement: No curator can do the work alone. Under the curator and editorship of Hans Jochen Scholl, the DIRL has been maintained and expanded over the years with the help of teams led by Jan Boyd, Galen Guffy, and Matthew Unruh and graduate student team members Andrea Leigh Berg, Leslie Harka, Grace Landers, Andrew Mckenna-Foster, Jessie Novotny, Marie Peeples, and Hannah Robinson.

Citation: Scholl, H. J. (2023). The Disaster information Reference Library (DIRL). Versions 5.5—6.0. Retrieved from: http://faculty.washington.edu/jscholl/dirl/

Please also note: The DIRL is provided on basis of self-service. Do not request any support.

Maintained by Hans Jochen Scholl and friends at the University of Washington‘s  Information School | This page was last updated 11/15/2023 13:26:01
GNU License

DIRL Version 5.5 — Semi-annual Update Released

Version 5.5 is the most recent update of this reference library. It has been published as of March 31, 2023 as a slightly early semiannual update. The library now contains 4,706 references of predominantly English-language, peer-reviewed work in the study domains of disaster information and information technologies and their uses in the context of disasters. This represents an increase over the previous version of 204 references, or 4.5%.

The DIRL is becoming an indispensable tool for Disaster Information and Technology-interested scholars. In particular, peer reviewers of paper submissions may want to rely on this reference library.

Packaged in a zip file, bibTeXRIS as well as an Endnote package (enlp) versions are available. Mendeley or Zoteroversions can easily be created by importing from RIS or bibTeX files. Please get back to us in case of any errors or omissions. Thank you for your interest and cooperation.

Acknowledgement: No curator can do the work alone. Under the curator and editorship of Hans Jochen Scholl, the DIRL has been maintained and expanded over the years with the help of teams led by Jan Boyd, Galen Guffy, and Matthew Unruh and graduate student team members Andrea Leigh Berg, Leslie Harka, Andrew Mckenna-Foster, Jessie Novotny, Marie Peeples, and Hannah Robinson.

Citation: Scholl, H. J. (2023). The Disaster information Reference Library (DIRL). Versions 5.5—6.0. Retrieved from: http://faculty.washington.edu/jscholl/dirl/

Please also note: The DIRL is provided on basis of self-service. Do not request any support.

Grateful Recipient of the IFIP Fellowship Award (2022)

In recognition of my academic contributions and standing in the field of information processing the General Assembly of the International Federation for Information Processing (IFIP) elevated me to the status of IFIP Fellow.

The Federation’s most prestigious award and distinction is the title of IFIP Fellow, which is conferred by the IFIP General Assembly on a current or past member of an IFIP body (e.g. WG, TC, GA, Domain Committee, IP3) in recognition of outstanding contributions in the field of information processing, in the role of a Technical Leader, Scientist, Engineer, or Educator.

Established in 1960 under the auspices of UNESCO, IFIP is the global organization for researchers and professionals working in the field of information and communication technologies. Recognized by the United Nations, IFIP links some 50 national and international societies and academies of science with a total membership of over half a million professionals.

In 2021, I was pleased by receiving the IFIP Service Award for my service to the field, in general, and inside IFIP working groups, in particular.

In 2020, the Digital Government Society had also recognized my academic impact on the field by making me an inaugural Fellow of this distinct professional society.

More information on 2022 IFIP Fellows can be found under https://www.ifipnews.org/ifip-names-new-fellows/

I am grateful for and humbled by these recognitions of my research impact and service contributions to the two domains of digital government and disaster information management.

4,502 References in the Latest DIRL Version (5.0)

The Disaster Information Reference Library (DIRL) is further expanding

Version 5.0 is the most recent update of this reference library. It has been published as of November 15, 2022 as a regular semiannual update. The library now contains 4,502 references of predominantly English-language, peer-reviewed work in the study domains of disaster information and information technologies and their uses in the context of disasters. This represents an increase over the previous version of 403 references, or 9.8%.

The DIRL is becoming an indispensable tool for Disaster Information and Technology-interested scholars. In particular, peer reviewers of paper submissions may want to rely on this reference library.

Packaged in a zip file, bibTeXRIS as well as an Endnote package (enlp) versions are available. Mendeley or Zotero versions can easily be created by importing from RIS or bibTeX files. Please get back to us in case of any errors or omissions. Thank you for your interest and cooperation.

Acknowledgement: No curator can do the work alone. Under the curator and editorship of Hans Jochen Scholl, the DIRL has been maintained and expanded over the years with the help of teams led by Jan Boyd, Galen Guffy, and Matthew Unruh and graduate student team members Andrea Leigh Berg, Leslie Harka, Andrew Mckenna-Foster, Jessie Novotny, Marie Peeples, and Hannah Robinson.

Citation: Scholl, H. J. (2022). The Disaster information Reference Library (DIRL). Versions 4.4—5.0. Retrieved from: http://faculty.washington.edu/jscholl/dirl/

Please also note: The DIRL is provided on basis of self-service. Do not request any support.

DIRL Version 4.4 Released

Version 4.4 is another semi-annual update of the Disaster Information Reference Library (DIRL). It has been published as of May 09, 2022, as a minor update. Another minor update will follow during this summer. The library now contains 4,099 references of predominantly English-language, peer-reviewed work in the study domains of disaster information and information technologies and their uses in the context of disasters. This represents an increase over the previous version of 166 references, or 4,2%.

The DIRL is intended to become an indispensable tool for Disaster Information and Technology-interested scholars. In particular, reviewers of paper submissions may want to rely on this reference library.

Packaged in a zip file, bibTeX, RIS as well as an Endnote package (enlp) versions are available for downloading. Mendeley or Zotero versions can easily be created by importing from RIS or bibTeX files. Please get back to us in case of any errors or omissions. Thank you for your interest and cooperation.

Please also note: The DIRL is provided on basis of self-service. Do not request any support.