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Take Me To The Liver

This parody (written by Greg Crowther) is sung to the tune of "Take Me To The River" (written by Al Green and Mabon "Teenie" Hodges and performed by Talking Heads).


Lyrics

I know why I need you like I do:
All the lymph and plasma you'll bring me through.
I'm a fat hitch-hiker who's afraid to get wet;
If I could catch a ride with you, I'd be in your debt.

I wanna go ... to the organ ... that will be my next host --

CHORUS:
Take me to the liver; keep me out of water.
Take me to the liver; keep me out of water.

I don't know why this guy's diet's so bad;
Think of all the healthy food he could have had.
But it's my cheesecake he's been ingestin',
And the next thing I know, well, I'm in the intestine.

I wanna go ... to a gland: ... the one that weighs the most --

CHORUS

Bind me, squeeze me, transport me, then release me.
But I can't. Yes you can.
No I can't. Yes you can.
Yes you can, yes you can, yes you can.... (Yes I can!)

I'll take you to the liver,
And I'll keep you out of water.
Yes, I'll take you to the liver,
And I'll keep you out of water.

Don't let me out yet, or I'll form a plaque;
The last thing we need right now is a heart attack.
Twenty-seven carbons there in my frame;
Am I the biggest lipid you can name?

I wanna go ... to some cells ... where I'll be endocytosed --

CHORUS

REPEAT  CHORUS


Comments

This song is about what happens to the cholesterol in food after the food is consumed. In brief, cholesterol is a very hydrophobic molecule, so it cannot travel through the lymphatic system or the blood vessels by itself. Instead, it is bound and sequestered by an amphipathic lipoprotein carrier (such as a chylomicron) until the carrier, along with its contents, is recognized by a target tissue and removed from the blood via receptor-mediated endocytosis. The lyrics below were written as if a molecule of cholesterol were actually singing to a lipoprotein. The lipoprotein itself has a small vocal part; it sings only the words in italics.