ANTH 410A | ENVIR 410A | ESRM 405A

GROWING STUFF
Ecology, Economy, and Politics of Resource-Extraction Ecosystems

Spring Quarter 2016
Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:30-3:20, CMU 228
Field trips all day Saturdays April 16, May 7, and May 28

Home Page
Requirements
Course Schedule
Discussion Board
Email the Class

READINGS
Introduction
Forest General
Forest Local
Forest Post-Mortem
Aquaculture Global
Aquaculture Local
Aquaculture Post-Mortem
Dairy General
Dairy Local
Dairy Post-Mortem

FIELD TRIPS
Forest Products
Aquaculture
Dairy

ESSAY ASSIGNMENTS Forest Products
Shellfish
Dairy
Instructor:
Stevan Harrell
Professor of Anthropology
Professor of Environmental and Forest Sciences
Adjunct Professor of Chinese
Faculty Associate, Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology
Adjunct Curator of Asian Ethnology, Burke Museum
Office: In Condon Hall, but I don't use it
email: stevehar@uw.edu

Overview

This is a field-, reading-, and writing- intensive course on how humans modify and manipulate ecosystems to produce useful resources. Throughout, we emphasize a systems perspective, closely examining the ecological, economic, and political effects of the elements of each system on one another. We also pay attention to analysis of systems at different scales of space, time, and complexity. Our specific subject matter encompasses ecosystems in Washington State that are modified to produce and extract three kinds of resources: forest products, shellfish, and milk products. Each three-week unit, including an all-day Saturday field trip, focuses on one of these three resource types. For each unit, students are required to read a series of articles, post on a discussion board, comment formally in class on some of them, go on the field trip, keep a field journal, and write a topical essay on an assignment dealing with problems of that type of resource system. Click here for a detailed explanation of requirements and grading policies.