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Interviews Posted

The web site Critical Margins: Perspectives on Book Culture, Technology, and Reading in the Digital Age has posted an interview with me about my book Nobody’s Business: Twenty-First Century Avant-Garde Poetics. The questions were tough ones: I ended up saying a lot more than I expected. Another interview, more of a questionnaire really, has also recently gone live over at The Volta, in issue 35 of Evening Will Come. I talk about book reviewing.

New Book Released!

Nobody’s Business: Twenty-First Century Avant-Garde Poetics is now available from Cornell University Press. Here’s how the poet-critic Michael Davidson describes the book: “The title of Nobody’s Business refers to the nose-thumbing qualities of all avant-garde practices and situates these gestures in a context of global economic crisis. Brian M. Reed addresses a range of important new developments that have emerged after language writing, notably the advent of conceptualism, digital poetry, and Flarf. Reed knows the poetics of these movements extremely well, and his prose is a delight to read.”

New Bird Leaves the Nest

Announcing the publication of Modern American Poetry: Points of Access (Heidelberg: Winter, 2013), edited by Kornelia Freitag and myself, a collection of essays providing info and advice to teachers on the high school and college level who would like to start including poets from Emily Dickinson to Prageeta Sharma in their curriculum.

Canberra Here I Come

I’ve received exciting news: the Humanities Research Centre at Australian National University has selected me as a Visiting Fellow for 2014. I’ll be spending next July and August in Canberra, and I’ll be participating in workshops and other activities related to the HRC’s annual theme, “Now Showing: Cultures, Judgments, and Research on the Digital Screen.”

On Its Way!

Cornell University Press has begun promoting my forthcoming book Nobody’s Business: Twenty-First Century Avant-Garde Poetics. It should be out in August 2013!

Pop Life

On Saturday 16 February I’m giving a paper titled “Bad Movies and Conceptual Poetry: Beyond the High/Low Divide.” It’s at 1:15pm, and it’s part of the Southwest/Texas Popular Culture Assocation annual conference in Albuquerque. Come hear me talk about such films as Kung Fu PandaAlien vs. Predator, and Purple Rain!

By the Seashore

It’s late notice, but if anybody’s in the neighborhood, I’m giving a paper titled “Now That’s Poetry: The Case of Vito Acconci’s ‘MOVE, REMOVAL (LINE OF EVIDENCE)’” today, 12 February 2013, at the University of California San Diego in the Michel de Certeau Room of the Literature building at 4:00 p.m. It’s part of a cool event called “Canonical Forms in Evolution” co-sponsored by the Music, Visual Arts, Chinese Studies, and Literature Departments at UCSD. My particular panel is called “Off Center” and it includes Jessica Pressman and Bob Perelman.

Seeing with the Mind’s Eye

On November 3rd, the exhibition Jasper Johns: Seeing with the Mind’s Eye opened at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and it will be running through 3 February 2013. I have an essay in the book that accompanies the show; so do Roberta Bernstein (!) and John Yau (!!). I talk specifically about Johns’s paintings Land’s End and Periscope (Hart Crane).

Learning from Las Vegas

I’m going to be attending this year’s Modernist Studies Association annual conference, which is in Las Vegas. The conference hotel is the Flamingo. And yes I will attend panels. Well, at least my own. If you’re in town & interested, I’ll be giving a paper titled “‘Some Old Dream of Kingship’: Christopher Brennan’s ‘The Wanderer’” (Aussie modernism ftw!) as part of the “Moving Spectacles: Modernism and Place” panel, 1:30-3:00 Saturday 20 October, in Red Rock V.

The Wildcard Bard

Tonight (October 5th) at Hugo House on CapHill in Seattle I’m reading along with Kasey Mohammad and Heather McHugh as part of a benefit/silent auction to raise money for Caregifted.  Should be a fun evening — come if you can!  I’ll be doing several “covers,” including Dada sound poetry, as well as a few translations, including Jan Andrzej Morsztyn’s totally Goth-Baroque “Do trupa” (“To a Corpse”).