UNIVERSITY of  WASHINGTON Information School Computer Science & Engineering
Jacob O. Wobbrock Associate Professor, The Information School
Adjunct Associate Professor, Computer Science & Engineering
  Jacob O. Wobbrock, Ph.D.
The Information School
University of Washington
Box 352840
Seattle, WA 98195-2840   USA
 
 

Short Biography

131 words  •  210 words  •  332 words  •  CV

Jacob O. Wobbrock is an Associate Professor in the Information School and, by courtesy, in Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington. His research in the field of human-computer interaction involves inventing new interactive technologies and studying people’s interactions with them. He has authored over 100 peer-reviewed publications, winning 10 best paper awards and 6 best paper nominations. He is the recipient of an NSF CAREER award and is on the editorial boards of ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction and Foundations and Trends in Human-Computer Interaction. He is an alumnus of Carnegie Mellon University (Ph.D. 2006) and Stanford University (B.S. 1998, M.S. 2000).

Since 2012, he has been on majority leave as Co-founder, President & CEO of AnswerDash, a VC-backed software startup bringing point-and-click contextual help to the web.
Jacob O. Wobbrock is an Associate Professor in the Information School and an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington, where he directs the MAD Lab comprising students from UW's information science and computer science programs. He is also the Co-Chair of the Master of Human-Computer Interaction + Design program. His field is human-computer interaction, where he focuses on understanding and improving how humans interactively exchange information with machines. He specializes in input techniques (text entry, pointing, touch, gesture, voice, gaze), mobile user interfaces, human performance measurement and modeling, research and design methods, and computer access for people with disabilities. He has authored over 100 peer-reviewed publications, 10 best paper winners, and 6 best paper nominees. He is the recipient of an NSF CAREER award and four other NSF grants. He is on the editorial boards of ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction and Foundations and Trends in Human-Computer Interaction. He obtained his Ph.D. in Human-Computer Interaction from Carnegie Mellon University in 2006 and his B.S. and M.S. from Stanford University in 1998 and 2000, respectively.

Since 2012, he has been on majority leave as Co-founder, President & CEO of AnswerDash, a VC-backed software startup bringing point-and-click contextual help to the web.
Jacob O. Wobbrock is an Associate Professor in the Information School and an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington, where he directs the MAD Lab comprising students from UW's information science and computer science programs. He is also the Co-Chair of the Master of Human-Computer Interaction + Design program. His research in human-computer interaction combines computer science, interaction design, and psychology to understand and improve how humans interactively exchange information with machines. He specializes in input techniques (text entry, pointing, touch, gesture, voice, gaze), mobile user interfaces, human performance measurement and modeling, research and design methods, and computer access for people with disabilities. He has a special focus on what he calls ability-based design, a design stance in which the abilities required to operate a technology are questioned, and systems are made operable by and adaptable to alternative abilities.

Some of his notable research projects include the user-defined gesture elicitation methodology, the $-family gesture recognizers, the model for pointing errors, ability-based design, the EdgeWrite text entry system, and gestures for touch screen accessibility, which developed techniques appearing in Apple's VoiceOver for iOS.

He has authored over 100 peer-reviewed publications, including 10 best paper winners (5 from ACM CHI) and 6 best paper nominees (also from ACM CHI). He is a recipient of an NSF CAREER award and four other NSF grants. He is on the editorial boards of ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction and Foundations and Trends in Human-Computer Interaction.

He received his Ph.D. in 2006 from the Human-Computer Interaction Institute in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University, where his advisor was Brad A. Myers. He also received a B.S. in Symbolic Systems in 1998 and an M.S. in Computer Science in 2000, both from Stanford University, where his advisor was Terry Winograd.

Since 2012, he has been on majority leave as Co-founder, President & CEO of AnswerDash, a VC-backed software startup bringing point-and-click contextual help to the web.