EDPSY 526        METACOGNITION SEMINAR           SPRING 2007


Reading Schedule

All readings can be downloaded as pdf files from ereserves.

Week

Topic

1

3/27

Introduction to metacognition, the course, and each other.

Kuhn, D. (2000). Metacognitive development. Current directions in psychological science, 9(5), 178-181.

For background, read ONE of the following

Hacker, D. J. (1998). Definitions and empirical foundations. In D. J. Hacker, J. Dunlosky, & A. C. Graesser (Eds.), Metacognition in educational theory and practice. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum, chapter 1, pp. 1-24.

Or
Schraw, G., & Moshman (1995). Metacognitive theories. Educational Psychology Review, 7, 351-371.

2

4/3

Metacognitive beginnings – where did we come from and how did we get here?

Paris, S. (2002). When is metacognition helpful, debilitating, or benign? In P. Chambres, M. Izaute & P.-J. Marescaux (Eds.), Metacognition: Process, function and use (pp. 105-120). Boston: Kluwer.

Read ONE of the following:

Flavell, J. H. (1979). Metacognition and cognitive monitoring: A new area of cognitive-developmental inquiry. American Psychologist, 34(10), 906-911.

Schoenfeld, A. H. (1987). What's all the fuss about metacognition? In Schoenfeld, A. H. (Ed), Cognitive Science and Mathematics Education, pages 189-215.

3

4/10

AERA Week: No class - work on project prospectus. Skim ahead to readings that you are interested in incorporating into your project.

4

4/17

Teaching people to be metacognitive. Guest speaker: Prof. John Frederiksen

Palinscar, A. S. (1986). The role of dialogue in providing scaffolded instruction. Educational Psychologist, 21(1-2), 73-98 .

White, B., & Frederiksen, J. (2005) A theoretical framework and approach for fostering metacognitive development. Educational Psychologist, 40(4), 211–223.

The two readings above are on specific interventions. For a more general approach, read ONE of the following (they are short and long versions of the same thing).

Short: Collins, A., Brown, J. S., & Holum, A. (1991). Cognitive apprenticeship: Making thinking visible. American Educator, 15, Winter, 6-11, 38-46.

Long: Collins, A., Brown J., & Newman, S. (1989). Cognitive apprenticeship: Teaching the craft of reading, writing, and mathematics. In L, Resnick (Ed.), Knowing, Learning, and Instruction: Essays in Honor of Robert Glaser, 453-494. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

5

4/24

Metacognitive development

Brown, A. L., & Reeve, R. A. (1986). Reflections on the growth of reflection in children. Cognitive Development, 1, 405-416.

Scardamalia, M., & Bereiter, C. (1983). Child as co-investigator: Helping children to gain insight into their own mental processes. In S. G. Paris, M. Olson, & H. W. Stevenson (Eds.), Learning and motivation in the classroom. (pp. 61-82) Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum

Possibly Kurtz, et al Strategy acquisition and transfer among American and German children: Environmental influences on metacognitive development. Dev Psy 1990

6

5/1

Social contexts and metacognition

Hogan, K. (2001) Collective metacognition: The interplay of individual, social, and cultural meanings in small groups' reflective thinking. In Columbus, F. (Ed.), Advances in psychology research, vol. 7, pages 199-239.

Examples/related readings:

Valot, C. (2002). An ecological approach to metacognitive regulation in the adult. In P. Chambres, M. Izaute & P.-J. Marescaux (Eds.), Metacognition: Process, function and use (pp. 105-120). Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Scardamalia, M.(2002) Collective cognitive responsibility for the advancement of knowledge. In B. Smith (Ed.) Liberal education in a knowledge society. Chicago: Open Court.

7

5/8

Goals and strategies, will and skill

Nolen, S. B. (1996). Why study? How reasons for learning influence strategy selection. Educational Psychology Review, 8(4), 335-355.

Pick TWO of the following three empirical studies:

Nolen, S. B. (1988). Reasons for studying: Motivational orientations and study strategies. Cognition and Instruction, 5(4), 269-287.

Pintrich, P., & de Groot, E. V. (1990). Motivational and self-regulated learning components of classroom academic performance. Journal of Educational Psychology, 82(1), 33-40.

Graham, S., & Golan, S. (1991). Motivational influences on cognition: Task involvement, ego involvement, and depth of information processing. Journal of Educational Psychology, 83, 187-194.

8

5/15

Self-regulated learning

Zimmerman, B. J. (2006). Development and adaptation of expertise: The role of self-regulatory processes and beliefs. In K. A. Ericsson, N. Charness, P. J. Feltovich & R. R. Hoffman (Eds.), The cambridge handbook of expertise and expert performance (pp. 705-722). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Winne, P. H. (1995). Inherent details in self-regulated learning. Educational Psychologist, 30(4), 173-188.

Commentaries on Winne (1995):

  • Boekaerts, M. (1995). Self-regulated learning: Bridging the gap between metacognitive and metamotivation theories. Educational Psychologist, 30(4), 195-200.
  • Pressley, M. (1995). More about the development of self-regulation: Complex, long-term, and thoroughly social. Educational Psychologist, 30(4), 207-212.

9

5/22

Metamotivation/Emotion control

Wolters, C. A. (2003). Regulation of Motivation: Evaluating an Underemphasized Aspect of Self-Regulated Learning. Educational Psychologist, 38(4), 189-205.

Read ONE of the following:

Boekaerts, M. (2002). Unraveling the mental representation students make of stressful events (pp. 39-59). In G. S. Gates & M. Woolverton (Eds.), Toward wellness: Prevention, coping, and stress. Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing.

Boekaerts, M. (2002a). Intensity of emotions, emotional regulation, and goal framing: How are they related to adolescents' choice of coping strategies? Educational Psychologist, 15(4), 401-412.

10

5/29

Project Sharing

Informal sharing of projects. Please bring copies of your abstract and bibliography.

6/4

FINALS WEEK: Last day to hand in written work: Monday 6/4 4pm