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More papers! Behavioral correlates of cranial muscle functional morphology

Check out the new issue of the Anatomical Record, co-edited with Adam Hartstone-Rose and Damiano Marchi! It is full of anatomical goodness, and showcases new findings and cutting-edge techniques in the study of muscle functional morphology. This issue contains several papers by Santana lab members:

Curtis A.A. and Santana S.E. 2018. Jaw-dropping: functional variation in the digastric muscle in bats. The Anatomical Record 301: 279–290. PDF

Santana S.E. 2018. Comparative anatomy of bat jaw musculature via Diffusible Iodine-Based Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography. The Anatomical Record 301: 267–278. PDF

Hartstone-Rose and Santana S.E. 2018. Behavioral correlates of cranial muscle functional morphology. The Anatomical Record 301: 197–201. PDF

Arbour J.A. and López-Fernández H. 2018. Intrinsic Constraints on the Diversification of Neotropical Cichlid Adductor Mandibulae Size. The Anatomical Record 301: 216–226.

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New paper: Auditory opportunity and visual constraint enabled the evolution of echolocation in bats

Why are there bats that do not echolocate, and how has body size and morphology constrained or facilitated the evolution of sensory diversity in bats? In a collaborative paper in Nature Communications, we present a broad phylogenetic comparative analysis that illuminates the trade-offs between vision and echolocation during bat evolution. You can access the open-access paper here. Enjoy!

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The evolution of anterior coloration in carnivorans

Why does the spectacled bear have facial stripes? Or why do canids have relatively plain faces? In a new article with the Caro and Stankowich labs, we explored the behavioral factors that might predict the diversity in facial and chest colors in carnivorans. Much to our surprise, we found that there might be different factors associated with the evolution facial and chest coloration in different lineages. Find out more by reading  the full article in Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, or its press coverage from Science.

Caro et al. 2017
Caro et al. 2017
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Amazing Animals!

On November 12, the Burke Museum held a new family event, “Amazing Animals“. Mammalogy joined the entomology and invertebrate collections in a fun day that allowed visitors to explore animal diversity. Abbie, Leith and Sharlene had a great time talking to families about bats, showing off 3D printouts of bat skulls, and handing out Pocket Bats cards.

    

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NASBR 2017

We travelled to Knoxville for the 2017 North American Symposium for Bat Research! As always, we had a wonderful time presenting and discussing our work, and catching up with our fellow bat biologists. Here are some highlights of the meeting:

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Leith Miller presenting her poster on the evolution of noseleaves and ears in phyllostomid bats
Rochelle Kelly presenting her work on San Juan Island bats
Rochelle Kelly presenting her work on San Juan Island bats
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Rochelle wins the Titley Electronics award for her presentation!
Abbie presenting her work on the comparative anatomy and function of the jaw-opening muscle of bats
Abbie presenting her work on the comparative anatomy of bats’ jaw-opening muscle
Presenting on the relationship between plant scents and bat diets
Sharlene presenting on the relationship between plant scents and fruit bat diets
A great turnout at the diversity breakfast!
A great turnout at the diversity breakfast!
Latin American friends!
Latin American friends from 7 countries!

 

 

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New Outreach Project: Pocket Bats!

pocket bats LOGO-01-01fullsizeoutput_14d6Postdocs, Dr. Abigail Curtis and Dr. Jessica Arbor, have just launched a new page on the Santana Lab website for our new and exciting outreach project “Pocket Bats!” Check out 3D augmented reality models of skulls from some of the amazing bats we are studying in the Santana Lab at the University of Washington using a free Augmented Reality app that works on iPhone and Android devices! We have already added five Pocket Bat Cards to the Pocket Bats page, with many more exciting species to come! Link: http://faculty.washington.edu/ssantana/wordpress/pocket-bats/

 

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Team returns from Costa Rica

Ada and Leith have returned from a successful trip to La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica! This field trip was part of our project investigating the coevolution between plant chemical signals and frugivorous bats. The team collected  scent samples from fruits, and conducted behavioral experiments to measure what scents bats prefer.  They were joined by our collaborators at the Dávalos and Rossiter labs, who are working on the sensory genomics of tropical bats.

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New paper by lab undergrad

Former lab undergrad Kristin Campbell has just published her study on sea otter skull and bite performance in the Journal of Mammalogy. Click here to learn whether and how differences in skull morphology and bite performance are related to diet specialization in these remarkable mammals.

 

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Habitat diversity & bat activity in vineyards

Rochelle setting up bat acoustic monitoring equipment in a Napa Vineyard
Rochelle setting up bat acoustic monitoring equipment in a Napa Vineyard

For her undergraduate honors thesis, Rochelle studied bat activity in North Coast vineyards. Using acoustic equipment, she tested whether local or landscape-scale habitat diversity influenced vineyard bat activity. Rochelle and her colleagues found that local habitat diversity significantly increased overall bat activity, especially for two of the most common bat species detected (the Yuma myotis & Big brown bat).

These species are also known to consume agricultural pests. Thus, promoting their activity in agricultural landscape will not only benefit bats, but may also help suppress agricultural pests. Rochelle’s research was published last week in the journal Agriculture, Ecosystems, and the Environment.

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SICB 2016 Symposium

Our 2016 SICB Symposium A bigger picture: organismal function at the nexus of development, ecology, and evolution was a great success! Throughout the day, a stellar roster of 10 speakers led us through their diverse research and perspectives on the study of ontogenetic inertia and its role in vertebrate macroevolution. In a complementary session, held the day before the symposium, 8 graduate students and postdocs presented excellent talks on topics related to ontogeny, functional morphology and evolution. A talented group of 6 American Indian and Native Alaskan undergraduates, invited as part of our broader impacts, also had a productive and fun meeting with the guidance of their grad student mentors. All this was possible thanks to efforts with co-organizer Paul Gignac, a National Science Foundation award, and support from the SICB Divisions of Vertebrate Morphology and Comparative Biomechanics. Stay tuned for the products of this symposium in an upcoming issue of Integrative and Comparative Biology.

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Undergrads, grads, postdocs and a subset of our symposium speakers at the post-symposium dinner
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