Research

Webcast – Epigenetic regulation of environmental response

Posted in News, Presentation, Research

Webcast – Epigenetic regulation of environmental response

Tune in Wednesday at 1pm (or later) to see Mackenzie defend her thesis entitled “Epigenetic regulation of environmental response in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.” More information available at  eagle.fish.washington.edu/mac  

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Ocean Acidification Research Highlights

Posted in News, Research

Ocean Acidification Research Highlights

With our lab’s focus on the physiological response of marine organisms to environmental change we have considerable interest in how changes in ocean chemistry impacts biology. Our efforts on this front can be categorized into 1) the organismal response to acute elevated carbon dioxide exposure and 2) the population level impact, which will be strongly influenced by local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity. While our research often integrates the impact at all levels, research highlights are outlined below based on these two biological levels. In addition to the research carried out by...

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Adaptive Potential and Native Shellfish Aquaculture

Posted in News, Research

Adaptive Potential and Native Shellfish Aquaculture

Aquaculture of native shellfish can impact nearby ecological systems and wild conspecifics by creating opportunities for genetic impacts on native populations. If wild populations are genetically adapted to local environmental conditions, interbreeding with cultured conspecifics from other locales may disrupt patterns of local adaptation, potentially jeopardizing wild populations by decreasing their adaptive potential. On the other hand, the addition of genetically diverse cultured organisms may enhance genetically depauperate populations. This enhancement is likely to occur in populations...

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Epigenomics and endocrine disrupting compounds

Posted in Research

Epigenomics and endocrine disrupting compounds

Project Summary Concern over human and wildlife health has brought increased attention to a group of emerging environmental contaminants referred to as endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs).  While progress has been made in describing the effects of these compounds in vertebrates, there are still gaps in our understanding of alternative modes of action and physiological effects outside of the reproductive axis. There is little known regarding the physiological impact and mode of action of EDCs in benthic macroinvertebrates. The research proposed here aims to characterize alternative modes of...

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Sablefish Broodstock Development and Functional Genomics

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Sablefish Broodstock Development and Functional Genomics

Research Summary: Sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria, aka black cod) is an excellent species for commercial culture because of its high price and fast growth in culture.  NOAA is developing the resources and techniques for intensive aquaculture of this species including the establishment of broodstocks from the wild and the production of monosex and sterile stocks to enhance growth and mitigate escapement concerns, respectively.  Domesticated broodstocks will be an essential resource as the industry moves forward since it provides a known genetic background upon which further improvement in...

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PROPS: Physiological Response of Oysters in Puget Sound

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PROPS: Physiological Response of Oysters in Puget Sound

The health of the Puget Sound ecosystem is significantly threatened by repercussions of human activity, including toxins, low dissolved oxygen, pharmaceuticals, pathogens, and invasive species. Here we propose to examine the direct and indirect effects of such threats on a significant player in the Puget Sound ecosystem – the Pacific oyster. We do not have a full understanding of the cumulative impacts of these stressors nor the long-term implications. Given the size of the system, it is certain that there are additional threats yet to be identified. The stature of the system also makes it...

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