Species delimitation paper is almost finished!

Itzue and Sima are almost finished with an exciting new species delimitation paper. They are submitting the paper in about one week. They already started blowing up balloons in anticipation of their celebration.

Getting ready for the party.

Getting ready for the party.

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Trip to a Patagonian Lizard Hybrid Zone

Jared Grummer recently returned from a field expedition to a Liolaemus lizard hybrid zone in Argentina. This is part of his dissertation research aimed at studying speciation in the group. You can read a full report on his field expedition at the Burke Museum blog. It contains a lot of photos of interesting looking lizards. Some of the lizards look suspiciously similar to Sceloporus. 

Liolaemus melanops relaxing in the shade. Photo by Jared Grummer

Liolaemus melanops relaxing in the shade. Photo by Jared Grummer

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NSF-Doctoral Dissertation Improvements Grants for Everyone!

We received some exciting news from NSF! Jared, Matt, and Rebecca each got their NSF-DDIG grants funded this year!  Matt and Jared applied to the Phylogenetic Systematics program, and they just heard the good news today. Rebecca submitted to the Evolutionary Genetics program, and she got the news last week. We are extremely grateful to NSF for their support!

NSF-DDIG grants:
Rebecca Harris: Investigating the genomic structure of speciation: a comparative approach using wagtails (Aves: Motacilla).

Matt McElroy: Comparative phylogeography and thermal ecology of Puerto Rican anoles.

Jared Grummer: Hybrid zone formation and comparative genomic divergences in South American lizards (Iguania: Liolaemidae).

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Matt wins Huey Award at SICB!

Matt McElroy received the 3rd annual Raymond B. Huey Award for the best student presentation at the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB) meeting. The competition is open to graduate students who are presenting independent research in ecology and evolution. Matt presented his dissertation work on thermal adaptation in Puerto Rican Anolis lizards. Congratulations Matt!

You can read more about Matt’s current research at the Science Positive Blog where Matt just posted some “Notes from the field”.

Recording body temperature from an Anolis lizard.

Recording body temperature from an Anolis lizard.

More on Matt’s Research: Matt tested predictions from the Bogert Effect, a classic hypothesis described by Ray Huey, Paul Hertz, and Barry Sinervo (Huey et al., 2003). The Bogert Effect describes how thermoregulatory behaviors may buffer natural selection acting on thermal physiology. Thermoregulating species are able to maintain specific body temperatures despite inhabiting different thermal environments. The Bogert Effect predicts that gene flow should be high  – and divergent natural selection weak – for populations of thermoregulating species that span a thermal gradient. Matt tested these predictions in Anolis cristatellus, a thermoregulating species that inhabitats a range of thermal environments on Puerto Rico, including a xeric and hot scrub forest in the Southwest. Matt collected genetic data both island-wide, and along elevational gradients, and found support for a genetically distinct population in the SW that correlates with the xeric scrub forest. Matt also found that genes flow out of the SW xeric forest, and from low to high elevations, but not the other way around. These results are surprising, because the Bogert Effect predicts that there should be bi-directional gene flow between xeric and mesic populations of lizard. These results indicate that there may be strong selection against cool-adapted individuals in warm habitats, but only weak selection against warm-adapted individuals in cool habitats. Therefore, selection on physiological traits may play an important role in generating and maintaining diversity in tropical ectotherms. Furthermore, these results have important implications for conservation, as locally adapted populations in the xeric SW may become a source for adaptive alleles during global climate change.

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Visiting Researchers Dr. Cilia Antoniou & Emy Karameta

Cilia & Emy

Cilia & Emy

We recently hosted our friends from Greece, Dr. Cilia Antoniou from the Institute of Marine Biology, Biotechnology and Aquaculture (IMBBC) and the Hellenic Centre for Marine Research (HCMR), and Emy Karameta from the University of Athens. They visited the lab for a few weeks to collect SNP data for their phylogeography and species delimitation projects focusing on taxa found in the beautiful Aegean Islands. Cilia and Emy are instructors at the annual Computational Molecular Evolution Workshop. Emy is studying agama lizards (Stellagama stellio) in the Mediterranean as well as the phylogeography of other co-distributed species found across the Islands. Cilia is studying a wide variety of taxa, including hares (not rabbits), dolphins, and even land snails. We’re looking forward to seeing them again in the UK in 2015, and then visiting them on their home turf in Crete in 2016.

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