everywhere

Forests Matter

Classes

I teach these classes at the University of Washington College of Forest Resources.

 

Photo: Norm Johnson

Home CV Contact Research Publications Students Classes Links

All text and photographs Copyright 1960-2007 Jerry F. Franklin or used by permission

Special 2009 Summer Course

Ecology and Management of Forests of Eastern Washington

(ESRM 491A)  July 6 13

 

website:  http://faculty.washington.edu/jff/esrm491a

Class

Number

Units

Semester

Ecosystem Management

ESRM 425

5

Autumn*

Scientific and social basis for ecological forestry. Forest practices to achieve integrated environmental and economic goals based upon material models of disturbance and stand development including alternative harvesting methods; adaptive management and monitoring; certification and global issues. Extended field trip class offered prior to commencement of Autumn Quarter. In 2007, the field trip was to the Sierra Nevada.

 

Landscape Ecology

ESRM 441

5

Winter**

Basic landscape ecology concepts, including patches, corridors, networks, spatial dynamics; island biogeographic principles; landscape analysis methods; landscape models. Applications of landscape ecology in resources management (e.g., cumulative effects, cutting, patterns, anadromous fisheries, management of wildlife populations, and open-space planning). Recommended: ESRM 326.

 

Old-Growth and Forest Management

ESRM 315/CFR521C

5

Spring

Biological and social elements of current conflicts, especially those associated with old-growth and its disposition. Ecology of Pacific Northwest forests and landscapes, history of forest practices, application of emerging science, proposed alternative practices and policies, including analysis of current proposal and its predecessors and successors. Open to majors and non-majors.

 

Integrated Management of Forest Landscapes in a Changing World

ESRM 427

3

Spring

This class, co-taught with Norm Johnson of the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, examines issues of preserving ecosystem structure and function while sustaining outputs from forested land.