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Darryl Holman's Research: Deciduous Tooth Emergence

djholman@u.washington.edu

Deciduous teeth emerge between birth and age three in all human populations. Compared to other growth traits, the timing of emergence for deciduous teeth is considered to be robust to moderate environmental insults, malnutrition, and disease. Consequently, emergence has been widely used to age children in populations without written age documentation and as a marker of growth and development for children. My colleagues and I have been investigating several aspects of deciduous tooth emergence, including:
  • Statistical methods for analysis of tooth emergence (Holman and Jones 1991, 1998)
  • Differences among populations in tooth emergence (Holman and Jones 1998, 2003)
  • Effect of health and nutrition on tooth emergence (Holman and Yamaguchi in press, Holman et al. submitted)
  • Sex differences in tooth emergence (Holman and Jones, 1991, 2003)
  • Aging children from tooth emergence (Konigsberg and Holman 1999, Holman et al. 2002)
  • References cited

  • Holman DJ, O'Connor KA, Jones RE. (submitted) Assessing biological mortality bias in deciduous tooth emergence. submitted. Also Working paper 04-01 Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology.
  • Holman DJ, Yamaguchi K. (in press) Longitudinal analysis of deciduous tooth emergence: IV. Covariate effects in Japanese children. American Journal of Physical Anthropology.
  • Holman DJ and Jones RE (1991) Longitudinal analysis of deciduous tooth emergence in Indonesian children: I. Life table methodology. American Journal of Human Biology 3(4):389-403.
  • Holman DJ and Jones RE (1998) Longitudinal analysis of deciduous tooth emergence II: Parametric survival analysis in Bangladeshi, Guatemalan, Japanese and Javanese children. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 105(2):209-30.
  • Konigsberg L, Holman DJ (1999) Estimation of age at death from dental emergence and implications for studies of prehistoric somatic growth. In Hoppa RD and Fitzgerald CM (eds.) Human Growth in the Past: Studies from Bones and Teeth. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 264-289.
  • Holman DJ, O'Connor KA and Wood JW. (2002) Estimating age-at-death distributions from skeletal samples: A multivariate latent trait approach. In Hoppa RD and Vaupel JW (eds.) Paleodemography: Age Distributions from Skeletal Samples. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 222-242.
  • Holman DJ, Jones RE (2003) Longitudinal analysis of deciduous tooth emergence: III. Sexual dimorphism in Bangladeshi, Guatemalan, Japanese and Javanese children. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 122:269-278.



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