LING 200: Introduction to linguistic thought

Winter 2007 (rev 3/9/07)

 

 

Instructor:

Alicia Beckford Wassink

Office:

Padelford A217

Office Hours:

MW 3:45 – 4:30p (and by appointment)

Phone:

616-9589 (Note: I rarely check voicemail; email is preferred)

Ling. Dept phone:

543-2046

Email:

wassink@u.washington.edu

Website:

http://faculty.washington.edu/~wassink

 

 

Classroom:

Bagley 131

Meeting time:

MWF 2:30 – 3:20pm

Course Website:

http://faculty.washington.edu/~wassink/LING200W07syll.html

 

                                              

Course Description

This course will introduce you to the field of linguistics: the scientific study and analysis of human language. In this course, you will learn both about the diversity of human language as well as some of its universal characteristics. The central goal of this course is to develop an understanding of what language is, how it is structured, and how it is represented in the mind. In pursuit of these goals, we will discuss answers to the following questions:

·         What does it mean to know a language?

·         How do we acquire this knowledge?

·         How do we use language in different individual, cultural, and social contexts?

The first half of the course will be devoted to surveying some of the core subfields of linguistics: phonetics (the study of the perception/production of speech sounds), phonology (the study of sound systems and patterns), morphology (the study of word formation and structure), and syntax (the study of sentence structure). In the latter part of the course, students are introduced to several of linguistics’ interdisciplinary subfields, including psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics and computational linguistics, which interface with other fields such as psychology, neurology, sociology, and computer science.

 

Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites for LING 200; however it is not open for credit to students who have taken LING 400. Likewise, if you have already taken another introduction to linguistics course in a different department (e.g., ENGL 390, ASIAN 401, SPHSC 303, etc.), you should not take this class.

 

TA sections

(Mailboxes for all TAs are in Padelford A210; “@u...” is an abbreviation for “@u.washington.edu”)

Sec.

TTh

Classroom

TA

Office hrs.

Office

email

AA

830-920a
DEN 205

Jonathan North Washington

TTh 1030-1130

LA1 110

jonwash@u...

AB

830-920a
DEN 314

Kristi Krein

Wed 930-1130

LA1 110

kreink@u...

AC

930-1020a
RAI 109

Kristi Krein

Wed 930-1130

LA1 110

kreink@u...

AD

930-1020a
SAV 151

Jonathan North Washington

TTh 1030-1130

LA1 110

jonwash@u...

AE

1030-1120a
LOW 111

Meghan Oxley

WF 1230-130

LA1 110

what@u...

AF

1130a-1220p
LOW 115

Meghan Oxley

WF 1230-130

LA1 110

what@u...

AG

1230-120p
MOR 226

Galen Basse

MW 1-220

ART 333

halo@ u...

AH

1230-120p
MUE 154

Sarah Churng

M 930-1130

LA1 110

ashra@u...

AI

1030-1120a
MGH 389

Galen Basse

MW 1-220

ART 333

halo@u...

AJ

230-320p
DEN 212

Sarah Churng

M 930-1130

LA1 110

ashra@u...

 

Textbook

Ø      Tserdanelis, G. and Wong, W. Y. P., eds. (2004)  Language Files: Materials for an introduction to language and linguistics (9th ed.). Columbus: Ohio State University Press.

The textbook can be purchased at the UW Bookstore (http://www.bookstore.washington.edu/). Be sure you buy the latest edition (9th ed.).

Ø                              The Language Learning Center, Denny Hall basement, has practice materials for several units. Point your browser to:

http://depts.washington.edu/llc/olr/linguistics/index.php

Ø                              FYI: Some books that might help you with your parts of speech:

Gordon, K. E. (1993) The Deluxe Transitive Vampire, New York: Pantheon.

Barry, Anita K. (1998)  English Grammar:  language as Human Behavior, Saddle River, NJ:  Prentice Hall.

Hurford, James R. (1994)  Grammar: A student's guide.  Cambridge:  Cambridge, UP

 

Requirements

1.      Exams (55% of course grade)

        There will be two exams. The first is a midterm exam (Feb. 9 – 25% of grade) and will cover the topics of the first six weeks of class. The second and final exam (Mar. 13 – 30% of grade) is cumulative, covering material from the entire course. An in-class review led by the TAs will be scheduled prior to each exam in the discussion sections. The exam format will primarily be multiple choice. You will need to purchase a Standard Answer Sheet (and use a No. 2 pencil) for both the midterm and the final.

        **See Policies regarding make-up exams, below.**

 

The final examination for this course is scheduled for Tuesday Mar 13 2:30-4:20 BAG 131 (rev 3/1/07)

2.      Homeworks (20% of course grade)

Approximately every week, you will be assigned a homework assignment in section, which will be due the following week in section (due dates to be determined). These assignments will test your knowledge and skills of that week’s topic. Your grades on these homework assignments (minus your lowest grade, which will be dropped) will combine to make up 20% of your course grade.

You must turn in the original copy of your homework. No photo-copied assignments will be accepted. All work should exclusively be your own. If we think that one person is doing the work for several, everyone involved will receive a zero for that particular assignment.

               **See Policies regarding late homework assignments.**

3.      Quizzes (15% of course grade)

Throughout the quarter, a series of quizzes will test your knowledge of the readings, lecture content, and class discussions. They may or may not be announced ahead of time. You should always come to section prepared to take a quiz on the lecture material and recent course readings. Your grades on these quizzes (minus your lowest grade, which will be dropped) will combine to make up 15% of your course grade. The format of the quizzes will primarily be True/False, matching, or short-answer and will serve as a practice for the exams.

4.      Participation (10% of course grade)

The discussions, group exercises, and demonstrations that will take place in the lectures and sections will benefit greatly from your regular attendance and participation. Although attendance is not specifically required, participation is. Your class participation grade will be calculated based on your informed contribution to class discussions and participation in class activities. If you are absent, it is your responsibility to seek out a classmate, discuss the class with him or her, and get a copy of his or her notes. Do not send the lecturer or section instructor an e-mail asking if anything important was covered or to summarize the class. Such emails will not be answered. Participation grades are administered by the TAs.

 

Grading

The following UW grading scale will be used (www.washington.edu/students/gencat/front/Grading_Sys.html):

  Percent  =  Grade

     ≥ 95%    =      4.0              88    =     3.3              81    =     2.6               74    =     1.9                   67    =     1.2

94        =      3.9              87    =     3.2              80    =     2.5               73    =     1.8                   66    =     1.1

93        =      3.8              86    =     3.1              79    =     2.4               72    =     1.7                   65    =     1.0

92        =      3.7              85    =     3.0              78    =     2.3               71    =     1.6                   64    =     .9     

91        =      3.6              84    =     2.9              77    =     2.2               70    =     1.5                   63    =     .8          

90        =      3.5              83    =     2.8              76    =     2.1               69    =     1.4                   62    =     .7

89        =      3.4              82    =     2.7              75    =     2.0               68    =     1.3          (< .7 is a failing grade)

 

Policies

Ø       Readings

The assigned readings are to be read in advance of the lectures. The readings complement the lectures and provide the necessary background; however, you should not assume that they will be fully summarized or reviewed in class. Students should be prepared to evaluate, integrate, or respond to the readings in class discussions.

Ø       Make-up exam/quizzes

There will be no opportunities to retake, postpone, or take an exam early. Make-up exams will only be allowed for (1) University sanctioned events (verification required) or (2) extraordinary circumstances (verification will be required BEFORE the make-up event is scheduled – e.g., physician's note). If you know you are going to miss an exam, please notify me as soon as possible BEFORE the exam so other arrangements can be made.

Because you are given the opportunity to drop the lowest quiz grade, there are likewise no opportunities to make up or repeat quizzes.

Ø       Late homework assignments

Homework assignments must be handed in at the beginning of class on the day it is due or it is considered late. Any assignments turned in after the beginning of class but before class is dismissed will receive a late grade penalty. Assignments turned in after class is dismissed receive no credit. No exceptions.

Because you are given the opportunity to drop the lowest grade, there are no opportunities to make up homework assignments.

Ø       Special needs

To request academic accommodations due to a disability, please contact Disabled Student Services, 448 Schmitz, 543-8924 (V), 543-8925 (TTY), uwdss@u.washington.edu. If you have a letter from DSS indicating that you have a disability which requires special academic accommodations, please present the letter to your instructor as soon as possible so the proper accommodations can be discussed and met.

Ø       Academic integrity

Students are expected to maintain the highest standards of academic ethics, honesty and integrity. Academic misconduct includes (but is not limited to) plagiarism, harassment, cheating, or representing another person’s work as your own, and will not be tolerated. It is your responsibility to read and understand the University’s expectations in this regard (which you can find in the back of your UW Student Planner or online at http://www.washington.edu/students/handbook/conduct.html). Any student found to be in violation of proper academic conduct will be dealt with in the strictest manner in accordance with University policy. 

 

Schedule

**Note: It is possible that dates, topics and reading assignments may change in order to accommodate class needs. You will be notified of any changes ahead of time.

***Note: There is no graded homework the first week of class. However, study questions will be provided before the video on 1/5. Write down your responses to these, and be prepared to discuss them in section Tuesday 1/9.

 

Week

Day

Topic

Readings

Today’s slides

1

W 1/3

Course overview, review of syllabus

1.1-1.2

pdf

ppt

 

[TH 1/4

NO SECTIONS]

 

 

 

F 1/5

What is language? Video: The Human Language Series, no. 1

1.3-1.4

 

2

M 1/8

Design features, animal communication

2.1-2.4

pdf

ppt

 

W 1/10

Phonetics 1: Anatomy & transcription

3.1-3.2

pdf

ppt

 

F 1/12

Phonetics 2: Consonants

3.3

pdf

ppt

3

M 1/15

**NO CLASSES – Martin Luther King, Jr. Day observed**

 

 

 

W 1/17

Phonetics 3: Vowels; Speech synthesis and recognition

3.4, 14.4-14.5

pdf

ppt

 

F 1/19

Phonology 1: Phonemes & allophones

4.1-4.2

pdf

ppt

4

M 1/22

Phonology 2: Phonological rules / exercises

4.3-4.5

pdf

ppt

 

W 1/24

Phonology 3: Phonotactics, speech errors

4.6, 9.9

pdf

ppt

 

F 1/26

Morphology 1: Word formation

5.1, 5.3-5.4

pdf

ppt

5

M 1/29

Morphology 2: Morphological analysis

5.4-5.5

pdf

ppt

 

W 1/31

Syntax 1: Constituents

6.1-6.2

pdf

ppt

 

F 2/2

American Sign Language (rescheduled from 1/26)

13.1-13.3

pdf

ppt

6

M 2/5

Syntax 2: Phrase structure, movement

6.4-6.5

pdf

ppt

 

W 2/7

Syntax 3: Word order

6.6

pdf

ppt

 

F 2/9

MIDTERM EXAM (bring answer sheet, No.2 pencil)

 

 

7

M 2/12

Psycholinguistics 1: Language and the brain: Guest lecturer, Laura McGarrity

9.1-9.2

pdf

ppt

 

W2/14

Psycholinguistics 2: Child language acquisition, the critical period, innateness

9.3

pdf

ppt

 

F 2/16

Psycholinguistics 3: Stages of development

9.4-9.6

pdf

ppt

8

M 2/19

**NO CLASSES – Presidents Day observed**

 

 

 

W 2/21

Sociolinguistics 1: Language and region

10.1-10.2, 10.4

pdf

ppt

 

F 2/23

Sociolinguistics 2: Language and SES

10.3, 10.9

pdf

ppt

9

M 2/26

Sociolinguistics 3: Speech styles

10.8

pdf

ppt

 

W 2/28

Language Contact: Pidgins and Creoles

11.1-11.3

pdf

ppt

 

F 3/2

Historical 1: Language families, endangered languages (rev 3/1/07)

12.1-12.2

pdf

ppt

10

M 3/5

Historical 2: Language change (phon., morph., semantic) (rev 3/1/07)

12.3, 12.6, 12.8

pdf

ppt

 

W 3/7

Summary and discussion of exam review process, course evaluations(rev 3/1/07)

 

 

 

F 3/9

Language and computers: Guest lecturer, Emily Bender(rev 3/1/07)

14.1-14.3

pdf

11

Tue 3/13

**FINAL EXAM (bring answer sheet, No. 2 pencil)**

     2:30 – 4:20pm in BAG 131