Monthly Archives: March 2014

You are browsing the site archives by month.

Bat of the Week: Nyctimene albiventer

Common name: The common tube-nosed fruit bat

Photos are not of N. albiventer, but of related species. Photo credit: Right: Bernard Van Elegem, top left: Alexander Riek, bottom left: adw.edu

Photos are not of N. albiventer, but of a closely related, similar looking species. Photo credit: Right: Bernard Van Elegem, top left: Alexander Riek, bottom left: adw.edu

Where to find them: Halmahera Islands, Banda and Aru Islands, Bismarck Archipelago, Moluccas, New Guinea, Admiralty and Solomon Islands and the Cape York peninsula of Australia.

Roosting:  The common tube-nosed bat roosts individually on the trunk of trees or branches. Their wings are covered with irregularly sized and spaced, yellow spots that act as camouflage while they roost.

Diet:  N. albiventer is primarily frugivorous, however it may also eat nectar and insect remains have been found in the stomachs of a few specimens. To eat fruit, the bat will hang horizontally biting off small chunks of fruit.

Unique traits: This bat has a unique face, with long tubular nostrils and very large eyes. The function of the tubular nostrils is unclear, however they could aid in finding fruit through olfaction or be used in the production of sound as the nasal tubes stretch and vibrate when the bat emits a high whistling call.

Recent research:  N. albiventer has been of interest in various feeding studies. One study documents the fruit handling behavior in both Old World (Pteropodidae) and New World fruit bats (Phyllostomidae).  While there is variation in the fruit handling behavior among all bat in this study, N. albiventer primarily held fruit with their stomach as opposed to with their wings, like most New world fruit bats (Vandoros & Dumont 2004).

Information from eol.org

Bat of the Week: Thyroptera tricolor

m4s0n501

Common name: Spix’s disk winged bat

photo credit: Top left: Christian Zielger, top right: Brock Fenton, bottom left: Alan Henderson, bottom right: adw.edu

photo credit: Top left: Christian Zielger, top right: Brock Fenton, bottom left: Alan Henderson, bottom right: adw.edu

 

Where to find them: Southern Mexico to the South Eastern Edge of Brazil

Roosting: Spix’s disk winged bat roost in the partly unfurled leaves of trees of the genus Heliconia (palm). Their roost colony size is about 6. These bats change roosts often, every day or so, because as leaves mature they unfurl and are no longer habitable roosts.

Diet:  T. tricolor is an aerial insectivore, catching insects while in flight. It consumes about 1 gram of insects a day, including beetles and flies. 

Unique traits: At the base of their thumbs and ankles is a disk-shaped suction cups that they use to cling to the  Heliconia leaves in which they roost. One of these disks is strong enough to support the bat’s entire weight. They also posses “warts” on their noses, it is hypothesized these “warts” are extra sensory organs.

Recent research:  T. tricolor uses call-and response systems to find group members. Flying bats can discriminate between the inquiry and response calls emitted by group and non-group members (Chaverri 2012).

Information from http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/

Follow

Get every new post on this blog delivered to your Inbox.

Join other followers: