Introduction to Global Health:

Disparities, Determinants, Policies & Outcomes

Course Syllabus for GH 101, GEOG 180, JSIS B 180

Instructors: Profs. Steve Gloyd & Matthew Sparke

“It is in the context of global forces that the suffering of
individuals acquires its own appropriate context.”

Paul Farmer

For Professor Gloyd's homepage here

For Professor Sparke's homepage here

 

 
Winter 2013 Schedule

Lectures: TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS, 8:30-10:20 GUG 220

Quiz sections meet once a week as listed in the UW Time Schedule (including during Week 1)

For weekly lecture list and assignments click here or scroll to the bottom of this page

For finding anything else fast on this one page website use command + F "command F" to search for it


Office Hours: Please confirm precise locations with TAs by email or in section
Professor Sparke, Tuesdays 11:30 - 1:30 Smith 303F (3rd floor at east end of the building)
Professor Gloyd, Tuesdays 11:30 - 1:30 Harris Hydraulics
Monica Farías Tuesdays 10:30 - 11:30 Hub fireplace room
Jana Shih Wednesdays 12:00 - 1:00  Hub fireplace room
Babatunde Adewoyin Thursday 12:00 - 1:00 Hub fireplace room
Mariel Boyarsky Thursdays 12:00 - 1:00 Suzallo Coffee
Beryne Odeny Fridays 9:00 - 9:50 Hub fireplace room

Research worksheets

For a worksheet guide for the Global Fund research project with the 7 component assignments click here

For a word document with all the individual assignment sheets inside click here

Class recordings For screen-casts and podcasts of all the lectures click here (Adobe Flash Player is required download from Adobe)
Glossary of global health terms For a wiki-glossary co-developed by students of key terms relating to global health click here
Research resources

For global fund research support, related search engines, global health maps and more click here

For the Intro to Global Health project page where all the Global Fund materials are available in one place click here


Course Goals
:

This course introduces global health by putting its contemporary definition, determinants, development and direction as a field into a broad global context. It is open to students from all disciplines. The class is divided into four core topics: i) the burden and distribution of disease and mortality; ii) the determinants of global health disparities; iii) the development of global health policies; and, iv) the outcomes of global health interventions. All are examined in relation to wider patterns of global interdependency, highlighting how both global health disparities and global health policy responses are themselves shaped by global ties and tensions.


1. We describe the global burden of disease and mortality in multiple dimensions – by geography, social class, race, and gender – and examine patterns of health and welfare disparity among all of these dimensions. Disparities in both acute and chronic disease patterns over time are also addressed, exploring the associated role of global social, political, and economic changes.


2. We examine the social, political and economic determinants of health disparities. Particular attention is paid in this respect to the ways in which global interdependencies that do not appear immediately related to health – the ties of global trade, of global finance, and of global governance – nevertheless play a role in explaining unequal experiences of sickness and health.


3. We explore ways in which different concepts of globalization shape distinct approaches to policy. We trace how health policy takes different forms in changing political-economic environments including discussions of primary health care systems (e.g. inadequate investment, health workforce migration management); disease specific policies (e.g., child survival, AIDS treatment); and economic policies (e.g. World Bank & IMF Structural Adjustment Programs, pharmaceutical patent protections). The course focuses on the most important and consequential of these with a view to helping students better understand the terrain of global governance in which any new global health policy is necessarily developed.


4. The fourth part of the class examines the outcomes resulting from the ways in which new global health policies change patterns of health practice and intervention globally. In this way we circle back to the basic question of definition, thereby evaluating the degree to which policy responses to global health disparities are taking global health further away from the fields of tropical medicine, international health and national public health from which it first developed.

PLEASE NOTE: THIS CLASS IS A 5 CREDIT CLASS AND COUNTS FOR A WRITING (W) CREDIT AS WELL AS ONE OF THE CORE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE GLOBAL HEALTH MINOR. IT COUNTS IN THESE WAYS WHETHER YOU TAKE IT UNDER THE GH 101 OR GEOG 180 OR JSIS B 180 REGISTRATION NUMBERS.

Required Texts


A set of selected readings that will be made available in a GH 101 READER available from Professional Copy and Print on University Ave after January 7th

These same selected PDFs are also downloadable from the links listed below under Reading

 

Recommended Music

Click here

 

Assessment of student work:

Midterm Exam in class Feb 5th, 2013 in GUG 220 30%

Final Exam Tuesday, March 19th, 2013,1030-1220, GUG 220

30%
Research project, to be completed by March 14th. 40%

For opportunities for extra credit click here or scroll to list at bottom of this page

 

Definitions of student work:

a) The midterm exam

This will be an in-class (closed-book) exam worth 30% of the final grade. STUDY GUIDE

b) The final exam

This will be a 2 hour (closed-book) exam worth 30% of the final grade. Tuesday, March 19, 2013,1030-1220, GUG 220

c) Research work  Global Fund Project Page for all the materials on one page

The research work and section participation will contribute 40% towards your final grade.Your major research project for Global Health 101 will be to write a modified Global Fund proposal.
The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria “was created to dramatically increase resources to fight three of the world's most devastating diseases, and to direct those resources to areas of greatest need.” By following key components of this disease specific policy development process, you will learn about the wider mechanics effecting funding for Global Health while also developing knowledge about heath needs and systems in a poor country setting. Over the quarter you will complete a series of seven assignments that will culminate with a modified proposal for submission to the Global Fund at the end of the quarter. Each assignment will contribute to the final product and allow for consistent progress on your proposal throughout the quarter. For a worksheet guide for the Global Fund research project with the 7 component assignments click here The grade break-down for Global Fund project and the 7 assignments: is as follows:

#1 Selecting a country 5%
#2 Gap analysis 25%
#3 Economic indicators 5%
#4 Political climate 5%
#5 Actors 5%
#6 Map 5%
#7 Proposal 50% (This 50% breaks down as follows: Intro/strategy 5%, Objectives 10%, Activities 10%, fit with existing agencies 10%, 5 issues 10%, potential opposition 5%).

For those wanting extra-understanding about the development of the Global Fund, please read this article about its historic achievements, and this more recent piece on its contemporary crises. And for everyone, the website of the Global Fund itself remains an indispensable and extraordinarily informative resource.

Week by week schedule of lectures, sections, and assignments



Week 1: Introductions

Jan 8

Lecture 1: What is global health? Introducing the field, class, and the global scale of health citizenship (Gloyd and Sparke) Download PDF of lecture

Reading: After lecture 1 you need to read this schedule and syllabus, as well as:

REQUIRED:

Jeffrey P Koplan, T Christopher Bond, Michael H Merson, K Srinath Reddy, Mario Henry Rodriguez, Nelson K Sewankambo, Judith N Wasserheit, "Towards a common definition of global health," The Lancet 2009; 373: 1993–95 Download PDF

Linda P Fried, Margaret E Bentley, Pierre Buekens, Donald S Burke, Julio J Frenk, Michael J Klag, Harrison C Spencer, "Global Health is Public Health," The Lancet, 2010, 375: 535 - 537 Download PDF

Declaration of Alma-Ata, from the International Conference on Primary Health Care, Alma-Ata, USSR, 6-12 September 1978 Download PDF

 

Jan 10

Lecture 2: Determinants of health and origins of Primary Health Care (Gloyd), plus movie: Child survival, the silent emergency, WGBH / UNICEF. Download PDF of lecture

Reading:

REQUIRED:

Global Health History Modules 2, 5, 6, 7.

Introduction to The World Health Report 2008 - primary Health Care (Now More Than Ever), available online from the WHO, or Download PDF

RECOMMENDED:

M Cueto, "The origins of primary health care and selective primary health care," Am J Public Health 94 (2004), pp. 1864–1874. Download PDF

K. W.Newell, "Selective Primary Health Care: The Counter Revolution," Social Science and Medicine 26 (1988): 903–906.Download PDF


Section

TAs Introduce themselves and students to each other. Go over how to find the syllabus online, how to access the password protected sections, and how to get the most out of the class.

Weekly assignments: Watch the first episode of the online movie Unnatural Causes, and ask yourself the question: how do the social determinants of health in the US that are highlighted by this documentary help us understand global health inequalities in the context of globalization? If you have time, also explore if the "Place Matters" analysis might be scaled up to analysizing disparities between different global locations? What does a global social gradient of health look like? Prepare yourself to talk about these questions in quiz section next week.

 

Week 2: The global economy and debt as a determinant of health

Jan 15

Lecture 3: Debt, SAPs, and impact on PHC (Gloyd) Download PDF of lecture

Reading:

REQUIRED:

Steve Gloyd, "SAPping the Poor: The Impact of Structural Adjustment Programs," Download PDF

Margaret Chan, WHO Keynote address at the 12th World Congress on Public Health. Istanbul, Turkey. 27 April 2009.

RECOMMENDED:

De Vogli R., Gimeno D. (2010). The G20 and the Three Global Crises: What Prospects for Global Health? J Epidemiol Community Health, 64(2), 99-100. Download PDF

Chapter One, The World Health Report 2008 - primary Health Care (Now More Than Ever), The challenges of a changing world, available online from the WHO, or Download PDF

 

Jan 17

Lecture 4: Movie Life and Debt

Reading:

REQUIRED:

Gorik Ooms, Ted Schrecker, "Expenditure ceilings, multilateral financial institutions, and the health of poor populations," The Lancet, 2005; 365: 1821–23 Download PDF

De Vogli R., "Neoliberal globalisation and health in a time of economic crisis," Social Theory & Health 2011, Vol. 9, 4, 311–325 Download PDF

RECOMMENDED:

David Stuckler, Sanjay Basu, and Martin McKee, "IMF and Aid Displacement," International Journal of Health Services, 2011, Download PDF

Washington Post article on contemporary debt crisis impact in Europe, "In Greece, fears that austerity is killing the economy."

 

 

Section

Discuss how the online movie Unnatural Causes helps us explore the contextual political and economic forces that shape health, and what needs to be added analytically to make it a more global analysis.

 

Weekly assignments: Download the worksheet guide for the Global Fund research project with the 7 component assigments click here. Prepare to discuss this 7 step research process and its organization with your TA in the upcoming quiz section in Week 3. For those wanting extra-understanding about the development of the Global Fund, please read this article about its historic achievements, and this more recent piece on its contemporary crises. And for everyone, the website of the Global Fund itself remains an indispensable and extraordinarily informative resource.

 

Week 3: Globalizaton and the verticalization of global health

Jan 22

Lecture 5: How do different understandings of globalization lead to different approaches to global health (Sparke) Download PDF of lecture

Reading:

REQUIRED:

Paul Farmer, "An Anthropology of Structural Violence," in Current Anthropology Volume 45, Number 3, June 2004, including follow-up exchange

Matthew Sparke, 2009, “Unpacking economism and remapping the terrain of global health,” in Adrian Kay and Owain Williams, editors, Global Health Governance: Transformations, Challenges and Opportunities Amidst Globalization, New York: Palgrave Macmillan: 131 – 159. Download PDF

RECOMMENDED:

WHO 2008 Report on the Social Determinants of Health pages 1 - 40

Ronald Labonté, Arne Ruckert, The Commission on Macroeconomics and Health: was it the right recipe? The Lancet, Vol 378 December 3, 2011, Download PDF


Jan 24

Lecture 6: From PHC to SPHC and Vertical programs: The role of Unicef, WHO, USAID, CDC (Gloyd) Download PDF of lecture

Reading:

REQUIRED:

Gorik Ooms et al, "The 'diagonal' approach to Global Fund financing: a cure for the broader malaise of health systems?," Download PDF

WHO Maximizing Positive Synergies Collaborative Group, An assessment of interactions between global health initiatives and country health systems, The Lancet 2009; 373: 2137–69, Download PDF

RECOMMENDED:

The Obama Global Health Initiative, US Government website and theglobalhealthinitiative.org, The Future of Global Health: Ingredients for a Bold & Effective U.S. Initiative Download PDF


Section

Discuss the challenges posed and questions raised by the worksheet guide for the Global Fund research project click here

Weekly assignments: Global Fund Assignment #1 Download Assignment 1 Worksheet Prepare to give your TA your completed assignment sheet in section (or if necessary because of a holiday) in class in the upcoming week 4.

For global fund research support, related search engines, global health maps and more click here

 

Week 4: Global health targets & the challenge of the market

Jan 29

Lecture 7: Targets of global health intervention, the enclaving of global health action, and the crisis of the 'emergency' (Sparke) Download PDF of lecture

Reading:

REQUIRED:

Laurie Garrett, "The Challenge of Global Health," Foreign Affairs, January /February 2007, Download PDF

Laurie Garrett, "Global Health hits crisis point," Nature, February 2, vol 482, page 7.Download PDF

Peter Redfield, "Doctors, Borders, and Life in Crisis," Cultural Anthropology, Vol. 20, Issue 3, pp. 328–361, Download PDF

RECOMMENDED:

Vinh-Kim Nguyen, Government-by-exception: Enrolment and experimentality in mass HIV treatment programs in Africa, Social Theory and Health, 7(3): 196–217.Download PDF


Jan 31

Lecture 8: Global trade agreements, TRIPS and monopoly rents on IP (Sparke) Download PDF of lecture

Reading:

REQUIRED:

Susan Craddock, 2007: “Market incentives, human lives, and AIDS vaccines,” Social Science & Medicine 64.5, March 2007: 1042-1057. Download PDF

Tina Rosenberg, A Trade Barrier to Defeating AIDS, New York Times online July 26, 2011

MSF, What’s Next For TRIPS And Health? 22 November 2011 IP Watch

RECOMMENDED:

Paul Farmer on Structural Violence and Health, Interview and Chapter One of Pathologies of Power

Section

Hand in Assignment 1 to TAs; Prepare for midterm STUDY GUIDE

 

Weekly assignments: Re-read to prepare for midterm STUDY GUIDE

 

 

Week 5: Global health NGOs and the challenge of partnering with governments

Feb 5

Lecture 9: In-class midterm exam in GUG 220 DOWNLOAD MID-TERM STUDY GUIDE

 

Feb 7

Lecture 10:International Agenices and NGOs (Gloyd) Download PDF of lecture

Reading:

REQUIRED:

James Pfeiffer et al, 2008, "Strengthening Health Systems in Poor Countries: A Code of Conduct for Non-Governmental Organizations," American Journal of Public Health, 98 (12). Download PDF

Anne Emanuelle Birn, Chapter 3 International Health Agencies, pages 61-131. Download PDF

RECOMMENDED:

TED talk on NGO failure on TED

David McCoy, et al, 2008, "Salaries and incomes of health workers in sub-Saharan Africa," Lancet 2008; 371: 675–81. Download PDF

 

 

Section

TAs will be offering mentoring on Global Fund project during section. Attendance is recommended, but not required

Weekly assignments: Global Fund Assignment #2 Download Assignment 2 Worksheet Prepare to give your TA your completed assignment sheet in section (or if necessary because of a holiday) in class in the upcoming week 6.

For global fund research support, related search engines, global health maps and more click here

 

Week 6: Mapping the global spaces of public health

Feb 12

Lecture 11: “Health Care Reform”: PHC, Drugs and Workforce (Gloyd) Download PDF of lecture

Reading:

REQUIRED:

Cynthia Eldridge, Natasha Palmer. Performance-based payment: some reflections on the discourse, evidence and unanswered questions. Health Policy and Planning, 2009; 24:160–166 Download PDF

RECOMMENDED:

Expansion of the private for-profit health sector in East and Southern Africa. Equinet Policy Series No. 26 Equinet-University of Cape Town Health Economics Unit with TARSC Nov 2011 Download PDF

 

 

Feb 14

Lecture 12: Disease surveillance and biopolitical profiling: from the ghost map to google maps (Sparke) Download PDF of lecture

Reading:

REQUIRED:

Andrew Lakoff, Two Regimes of Global Health, Humanity Fall 2010 Download PDF

Didier Fassin, Another Politics of Life is Possible, Theory Culture Society 2009 26: 44 Download PDF

RECOMMENDED:

Global health mapping innovation examples:WHO'S Health Mapper, HealthMap, WorldMapper, If It Were My Home

 

Section

 

Hand in Assignment #2 to TA in section. Use section time to discuss how mapping tools can be used to represent results of Gap Analyses and research on economic context for Global Fund proposal

 

Weekly assignments:

.Global Fund Assignment #3 Download Assignment 3 Worksheet and also begin Assignment #6 Download Assignment 6 Worksheet Be ready to hand in the completed worksheet for Assignment 3 in Section in week 7.

 

Week 7: Horsemen of the global apocalypse?

Feb 19

Lecture 13: Global health and myths of overpopulation (Gloyd) Download PDF of lecture

Reading:

REQUIRED:

Feb 21

Lecture 14: War, imperialism and global health (Gloyd) Download PDF of lecture

Reading:

REQUIRED:

People's Health Movement, "Terror, War and Health," from Global Health Watch 2: An Alternative World Health Report, London and Cairo: Zed Press, 2008: 112 - 125. Download PDF

 

Section

 

Hand in Assignment #3 to TA in section; TAs provide guidance on Assignment #4: Leadership & Capacity: including on using two or three scholarly sources, describe the political climate in your chosen country.

 

Weekly assignment: Global Fund Assignment #4 Download Assignment 4 Worksheet Be ready to hand in the completed worksheet for Assignment 4 in Section in week 8.

 

Week 8: Global biocapital and the epidemiology of inequality

Feb 26

Lecture 15: The global epidemiology of inequality and the case of the flu (Sparke) Download PDF of lecture

Reading:

REQUIRED:

Matthew Sparke, with Dimitar Anguelov, "H1N1, Globalization and the Epidemiology of Inequality," accepted and forthcoming in Health and Place, 2012.

Robert G. Wallace, "Breeding Influenza: The Political Virology of Offshore Farming," Antipode, Vol. 41 No. 5 2 pp 916–951 Download PDF

RECOMMENDED:

Rob Wallace's Blog Farming Pathogens

 

 

Feb 28

Lecture 16: The ties of global (bio)capital (Sparke) Download PDF of lecture

Reading:

REQUIRED:

João Biehl, "Pharmaceuticalization: AIDS Treatment and Global Health Politics, Anthropological Quarterly, 2007, Download PDF

Brian Salter, Melinda Cooper, Amanda Dickins & Valentina Card, "Stem cell science in India: emerging economies and the politics of globalization," Regenerative Med. (2007) 2(1), 75–89 Download PDF

RECOMMENDED:

Adriana Petryna, "Clinical Trials Offshored: On Private Sector Science and Public Health," BioSocieties (2007), 2, 21–40. Download PDF

Margaret Chan, 2011, "Better access to generic medicines," WHO

 

 

 


Section

 

Hand in Assignment #4 to TA; Review recent lecture materials and discuss plan to review online maps in ways that provide useful feedback from both TAs and fellow students.

Weekly assignment:

Global Fund Assignment #5 Download Assignment 5 Worksheet and also complete Assignment #6 Download Assignment 6 Worksheet Prepare to hand-in Assignment 5 in section in Week 9, and put the URL for your online map (created as Assignment 6) on the class map blog page.

 

Week 9: The challenges of making global health inclusive and sustaianable

March 5

Lecture 17: Movie:- Dead Mums Don't Cry click here for more information

Reading:

REQUIRED:

Hogan MC, Kyle J et al. Maternal mortality for 181 countries, 1980–2008:a systematic analysis of progress towards Millennium Development Goal 5. Published online April 12, 2010 www.thelancet.com Download PDF

March 7

Lecture 18:Global cities, global health and Seattle’s curative cosmopolitanism (Sparke) Download PDF of lecture

Reading:

REQUIRED:

Matthew Sparke, 2011, "Global Seattle: The City, Citizenship and the Meaning of World Class," in Michael Brown and Richard Morrill, eds. Seattle Geographies, Seattle: University of Washington Press. Download PDF

and WGHA video

 

Section

 

Use section time to do peer review of work done to date on Global Fund project. Bring 4 copies of your draft paper to class (it must be at least 7 pages long by now and ideally include a print out of your map(s) too). Share with your country/region specific sub-group.. Be sure to incoporate insights from the 2 academic articles. Peer subgroups develop and give feedback on draft papers in class time. :

Weekly assignments:

Global Fund Assignment #7 Download Assignment 7 Worksheet

It is not obligatory, but if you want more feedback on your term paper from your TA, fully revise it as a 3,000 word paper to be handed in by March 5th.

 

 

Week 10: The future of global health

March 12

Lecture 19: The Future is YOU: Reflections on what to do with critical knowledge (Sparke and Gloyd)

Reading:

REQUIRED:

 

 

March 14

Lecture 20: Review for final; and compare and contrast Dan Pallotta , Slavoj Zizek, Ananya Roy on overcoming the limits of moralistic charity models that they all argue (but in very different ways) are overfocused on personal virtue

Reading:

REQUIRED:

Julio Frenk, Lincoln Chen et al, Health professionals for a new century: transforming education to strengthen health systems in an
interdependent world, The Lancet, November 29, 2010 Download PDF

Betsey Brada, "'Not Here’: Making the Spaces and Subjects of ‘‘Global Health’’ in Botswana," Cult Med Psychiatry (2011) 35:285-312 Download PDF

 

Section

 

Review lecture and reading material for Final

For Final Exam review sheet click here

Weekly assignments: Finish research paper to hand in during lecture on March 14th.

 

Final Examination, Tuesday, March 19, 2013,1030-1220, GUG 220

For Final Exam review sheet click here



Extra credit is also available in this class for going to lectures listed immediately below this note (and proving your attendance to your TA with a one paragraph statement highlighting how the extra talk addressed key learning goals of GH 101). You can get a maximum of 5% extra credit this way over the quarter, 1% per lecture added to your overall Global Fund project report % grade.

Extra credit lectures for Winter 2013 (please check back here as we frequently add newly announced events on campus)

Jan 10th Dilys Walker and distinguished panel, Legal and Policy Solutions to Improve the Global Health of Women, Children, and Adolescents, William H. Gates Hall, Room 127
5:30pm-6:30pm Reception following.

Jan 11th Documentary Screening: "Haiti: Where Did the Money Go?" 3:30 PM, Foege North (Bioengineering), N-130, 1705 NE Pacific St., Seattle, WA 98195

Jan 11th Conference: "Human Trafficking in an Era of Globalization" 8:30 AM - 1/12/13 5:00 PM HUB (Husky Union Building), North Ballroom

Jan 12th Conference: "Human Trafficking in an Era of Globalization" 8:30 AM - 1/12/13 5:00 PM HUB (Husky Union Building), North Ballroom

Jan 17th Anne Firth Murray, Founding President, The Global Fund for Women, “Critical Issues in International Women's Health and Education” in Foege Auditorium at 1:00pm

Jan 17th Anne Firth Murray and panel, Education of Girls as a Path to Global Health Equity, William H. Gates Hall | Room 133, 5:30pm-6:30pm | Reception following

Jan 17th Shannon Speed, Indigenous Women Migrants and Human Rights in the Era of Neoliberal Multicriminalism, 4:00 PM, Communications 120

Jan 22nd, Charlene Strong, Chandan Reddy, & Amie Bishop, "Queering Global Health: A critical panel discussion about improving access to quality health care for all people and communities" 4:30-6:00pm HUB 332

Jan 22nd Jordan Lewis, "Healthy Living Based On the Experiences of Alaska Native Elders," 12:30-1:30pm School of Social Work, Room 305 (corner of 15th and 41st)

Jan 28th Conversation with Zanele Muholi on gender and sexual violence in Africa, 7:00 pm, Tuesday, January 29, 2013, Kane Hall 225

Jan 29 Guy Palmer, Global Health Through a Multi-Disciplinary Lens, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Foege Auditorium, Genome Sciences Building, 3720 15th Avenue NE, Seattle, WA 98195
Reception: Foege Auditorium Lobby, 5:30-6:30 p.m.

Jan 29th, Film Screening, of Zanelle Muholi's movie "Difficult Love", 6:00 pm, Wednesday, January 30, 2013, Allen Auditorium in Allen Library

Jan 31st Legal and Policy Solutions to Improve the Global Health of Women, Children, and Adolescents, William H. Gates Hall Room 133, 5:30pm-6:30pm | Reception following, featuring Alexandra Molnar, MD
Clinical Instructor, School of Medicine; Amy Alexander, Attorney, Northwest Justice Project, Jorge Barón, JD Executive Director, Northwest Immigrant Rights Project, Ahoua Kone, MPH, JD Partner, Seattle Immigration and Family Law Group Director, Cote d’Ivoire Health Projects, HAI

Feb 5th Critical Development Forum, "Thinking Globally: Challenging ourselves to be critical of development work at home and abroad," 4:30pm to 6:30pm, The Simpson Center, Communications 120

Feb 8th, Flu Forum: The Ethics and Politics of Influenza Research in a Global Context 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm Simpson Center conference room (CMU 202)

Feb 11th Rob Wallace, "Are we researching our way into a deadly pandemic?" noon Communication 202.

Feb 13th, Robert LeVine,“Pathways between women’s schooling and lower child mortality through literacy and classroom communication.” 4:15PM to 5:30PM at the IHME office in Belltownn location

Feb 15th, “Health Frontlines: Insights from Benghazi,” in Health Sciences Building, 3:30 - 5:30 pm Health Sciences Building room T-625. (An opportunity to hear physicians and leaders from Benghazi Medical Center report from the field on their experiences during the Libyan Revolution. Theevent will feature two speakers: Dr. Fathi Salem Jehani who will talk on “The Benghazi Medical Center: Response to Revolution and Beyond.” and Dr. Laila Taher Bugaihis who will talk on “Libyan Women: War and Beyond.”)

Feb 28th Connecting Study Abroad to Experiences at Home Panel Discussion. Panelists Phillip Thurtle, Anu Taranath, Julie Villegas and Samantha Albert will discuss how study abroad has shaped their academic and professional lives back home. Mary Gates Hall 210, 2:30 - 3:30pm.

March 6th, Ron Eglash, "Computing for Social Justice and Sustainability," 6: 30 - 7:30pm Kane 120 REGISTER HERE

Plus any seminars on the following schedules that look like they relate to global health (but be aware cancellations can happen, so please double-check with the home department website before heading to south campus)

Global Health Seminar: Fridays, 12:30-1:50pm -schedule
IHME seminars: Wednesdays, 4:15pm -schedule (please note these take place at IHME's downtown location)
Pathobiology Seminar: Thursdays, 4-5pm  -schedule
PHEnOM Seminar: Thursdays, 3-4:30pm  -schedule
Epidemiology Seminar: Monthly/Tuesdays, 3:30-4:40pm  -schedule
Biostatistics Department Seminar: Thursdays, 3:30-5pm -schedule
Biostatistics Student Seminar: Wednesdays, 3:30-5pm -schedule
Environmental Health Seminar: Thursdays, 12:30-1:30pm -schedule