Posts Tagged ‘Teaching’

Web Resources I Wish I’d Known About Before Teaching Intro Physics

I originally posted a list like this on Facebook. Here’s the full list of “cool stuff on the web” so far: Tracker – Free video-analysis software: http://www.cabrillo.edu/~dbrown/tracker/ High speed video collection: http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/high_speed_video/ Cheap 3D laser scanning: http://www.instructables.com/id/EMWRPLGDH2EP285ZVG/ Fantastic Contraption – a physics related game: http://fantasticcontraption.com/ Along the same lines, Crayon Physics: http://www.crayonphysics.com/ High-speed still motion [...]

Apply to Sail: School of Rock 2009

The Consortium for Ocean Leadership periodically puts out a call for teachers (from K-12 teachers to undergrad-focused professors) to sail on the drill ship JOIDES Resolution as part of the “School of Rock” program. School of Rock puts out some very good classroom activities written by educators who (thanks to the program) have hands-on experience [...]

List of Physics-Related Education Blogs

Ooh! Ooh! Ooh! I can’t believe I missed this. Thanks to Arjendu at Confused at a Higher Level for pointing out this post by Richard Hake to AERA-L. AERA-L Archives — November 2008 #2. Update 1/10: A list of over 60 education-related blogs posted by Hake as a follow-up to his initial AERA-L post.

Peer Instruction and Student Guesses

I’ve been meaning to post this for a couple of days now: I think I’m going to have a lot to chew on in the most recent Science – more than just one post. So here’s just a little bit, on an article by Smith et al. on peer instruction. I think this might be [...]

Science Magazine Issue on Education and Technology

The January 2 Science is a special issue on Education and Technology. I’ll be blogging about this later today, once I’ve read a few of the articles. There’s one on the National Science Digital Library, one on the Digital Library for Earth Science Education, one on peer discussion, one on games… a ton of good [...]

Global Change – A Long View

We who teach the introductory-level environmental science courses often single out humans, as a species, for changing the global physical and biological environment. The changes are so great, we say, that a group of geoscientists has been pushing to call our current epoch of geologic time the Anthropocene. Perhaps we give ourselves too much credit: [...]