Posts Tagged ‘Teaching’

It Ain’t What You Do (But The Way That You Do It)

Chairing a session at a scientific meeting has its advantages and disadvantages. One of the major disadvantages is that you miss out on a half day’s worth of talks (at least, you do at GSA, where the sessions last a half day; they’re shorter at AGU). Although I got to see some cool stuff this [...]

In Portland

Writing this from my room at the fabulous McMenamin’s Kennedy School (the only hotel I’ve ever stayed in with chalkboards in the rooms, four bars, and a movie theater…) after a rather successful Pardee session at the 2009 GSA. Among the highlights: There seems to be a growing push for a sort of crowdsourcing in [...]

Pre-GSA Week

It’s the week before the Geological Society of America annual meeting. AAAAGGGH!!!! Here’s a preview of what I’m working on: Google Earth image with 1940 aerial image overlay (and grid) showing Puyallup River valley between Puyallup and Tacoma. Image from Puget Sound River History Project. As environmental science instructors, we like to hope we can [...]

Visualizing Environmental Impact

I just received an evaluation copy of Anthony N. Penna’s The Human Footprint: A Global Environmental History (Wiley-Blackwell) in the mail today. It looks fantastic, at least from my cursory first glance: an environmental studies text from a historical/anthropological point of view. I also like Andrew Goudie’s The Human Impact on the Natural Environment (also [...]

Physics Surprises

I’d forgotten about this website from Rutgers – a collection of demos and experiments I’d used frequently my first time I teaching physics. My favorites are in the “Surprising data, puzzles, problems” section. Learning Cycles on Surprising data, puzzles, problems.

Southern CA Fires and Other Hazards

Because I’m from Pasadena, I’ve been keeping a close eye on what’s been going on with the Station fire. This is the one that’s been burning in the San Gabriel Mountains north of the LA basin for the past week or so. Because the fire is threatening a lot of places I know pretty well, [...]

YouTube – Fred Vine explaining Paleomagnetic reversals

Fred Vine, of the Vine-Matthews-Morley hypothesis, explains the pattern of seafloor magnetic reversals in what I believe is a TV show from the 70s. More info on the source as I figure it out. Vine uses a number of pedagogical techniques that we still trot out to demonstrate magnetic reversals and seafloor spreading: the cut [...]

Highly Recommended: Early Career Geoscience Workshops

Just finished a Cutting Edge workshop: Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Teaching, Research, and Managing Your Career. I found the workshop fascinating and extraordinarily useful. Of course, I suppose the final verdict really awaits the next round of NSF funding. In any case, I highly recommend the workshop to new faculty in the geosciences (loosely defined [...]

Nooksack Cirque Panorama

Super cool annotated panorama of a cirque in the north Cascades. This kind of thing would be a great GigaPan project (see also: xrez), and would be fun to do with a class – say, physical geography. Print is available from the photographer for $84 plus shipping. Nooksack Cirque Panorama by Greg Higgins.

Learning Styles Questionnaire

I had to take this test as part of an Early Career workshop I’ll be participating in in June. I think I’m going to give this to my students next time I teach Physics I. Index of Learning Styles Questionnaire.