Posts Tagged ‘ScienceSociety’

It Ain’t What You Do (But The Way That You Do It)

Chairing a session at a scientific meeting has its advantages and disadvantages. One of the major disadvantages is that you miss out on a half day’s worth of talks (at least, you do at GSA, where the sessions last a half day; they’re shorter at AGU). Although I got to see some cool stuff this [...]

In Portland

Writing this from my room at the fabulous McMenamin’s Kennedy School (the only hotel I’ve ever stayed in with chalkboards in the rooms, four bars, and a movie theater…) after a rather successful Pardee session at the 2009 GSA. Among the highlights: There seems to be a growing push for a sort of crowdsourcing in [...]

More Awesomeness

From one of the reviews: “And in case you find yourself in my position, I can confidently report that Duncan Hines Classic Yellow Cake Mix is also a completely inadequate raw material for the same project. Not to mention the mess it makes in the centrifuges.” via Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: Uranium Ore.

Geophysics in Action

From the San Jose Mercury News: “Ground penetrating radar is used on the next-door neighbor’s property of kidnap suspects Phillip and Nancy Garrido Friday Sept. 19, 2009 at the site in unincorporated Antioch, Calif. Investigators also tore down a shed in the Garrido backyard and hauled away the debris.” Photo credit: Karl Mondon/Staff. The San [...]

Visualizing Environmental Impact

I just received an evaluation copy of Anthony N. Penna’s The Human Footprint: A Global Environmental History (Wiley-Blackwell) in the mail today. It looks fantastic, at least from my cursory first glance: an environmental studies text from a historical/anthropological point of view. I also like Andrew Goudie’s The Human Impact on the Natural Environment (also [...]

Southern CA Fires and Other Hazards

Because I’m from Pasadena, I’ve been keeping a close eye on what’s been going on with the Station fire. This is the one that’s been burning in the San Gabriel Mountains north of the LA basin for the past week or so. Because the fire is threatening a lot of places I know pretty well, [...]

Places and Spaces: Mapping Science

A while ago, I was preparing a post critiquing a map of domains of scientific knowledge based on users’ database searches. The post never made it to completion, but the idea apparently caught on with other people besides just me. Indiana University has a fascinating exhibit with a bazillion maps of domains of scientific knowledge, [...]

Highly Recommended: Early Career Geoscience Workshops

Just finished a Cutting Edge workshop: Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Teaching, Research, and Managing Your Career. I found the workshop fascinating and extraordinarily useful. Of course, I suppose the final verdict really awaits the next round of NSF funding. In any case, I highly recommend the workshop to new faculty in the geosciences (loosely defined [...]

WANT!

From Wired (boldface is mine): Various blogs claim receiving tips from informed sources about features in the highly anticipated handset, such as a magnetometer (digital compass), a video camera and a speedier processor. Sweet! I can’t wait for paleomagnetism to get in on the citizen science action (à la Quake Catcher Network).

GSA Sessions on Virtual Globes, Web 2.0, and More!

[This is an announcement I'll be sending out shortly to a number of sites. I believe Kyle has posted it to his blog. I'm not sure whether Ron (blogs here and here and here) has done so yet. Pass it on!] We are pleased to announce a pair of sessions at the 2009 GSA meeting [...]