A drawing of the seafloor, with the artist's interpretation of a turbidity current

A Bengal Fan Backgrounder

As I’ve been writing these blog posts, I’ve been trying to include footnotes that point you deeper into the scientific literature about paleomagnetism, rock magnetism, and the geology of the Bengal Fan. But if you’re a student planning on working with me this coming quarter, you might want a little more background than what I’ve been putting in the blog footnotes. Here are some places to start.

Note: this is not at all exhaustive or up to date. I’m trying to choose articles that I’d give to students who are taking or about to take a middle-division course in geology (e.g. sedimentology). These are not necessarily the earliest or latest, or the most relevant to the specific things we’re doing out here, but these will get you started. I may introduce a couple of more specific key ideas in future blog posts. Watch this space for more. Email me or comment if you have any suggestions!

First, if you’re just a casual reader who may be interested in working with me on a project when I get back, you might start with Diane Hanano’s blog post on deep drilling.

For a big-picture view of the growth of the Himalaya and some of the questions geologists have about it: Molnar, P. (1997) The rise of the Tibetan Plateau: From Mantle Dynamics to the Indian Monsoon. Astronomy and Geophysics 38:10-15. (Link)

Why we care about the erosion of the Himalaya: Raymo, M.E., and W.F. Ruddiman (1992) Tectonic forcing of late Cenozoic climate. Nature 359: 117-122.

For a summary of the sedimentary processes occurring on the Bengal Fan itself, with lots of maps: Curray, J.R., F.J. Emmel, and D.G. Moore. (2003) The Bengal Fan: morphology, geometry, stratigraphy, history and processes. Marine and Petroleum Geology 19: 1191-1223.

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