Category Archives: Uncategorized

New maps show expected global species shifts due to climate change

A new Nature paper from the NCEAS Marine Cliamte Impacts Working group (including Lauren) provides a global map of where species are likely to succeed or fail in keeping up with a changing climate.

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Eco and evo physiology at SICB meeting

Sorry to miss SICB this year, but reports are that collaborators gave great presentations: Joel Kingsolver on evolutionary adaptation in butterflies, Heidi MacLean on thermal stress and heat tolerance in butterflies, and Ofir Levy on bringing regional climate data to the organismal level.

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Modern caterpillars feed at higher temperatures in response to climate change

A study led by graduate student Jessica Higgins (UNC) found that caterpillars of two species of butterflies in Colorado and California have evolved to feed rapidly at higher temperatures and at a broader range of temperatures over the past 40 years, suggesting that they are evolving quickly to cope with a hotter, more variable climate. More […]

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New study on biological responses to climate change in marine systems

Oceans cover 71 percent of the Earth’s surface, yet our knowledge of the impact of climate change on marine habitats is a mere drop in the proverbial ocean compared to terrestrial systems. The journal Nature Climate Change published the new findings of a three-year study conducted by a NCEAS working group which shows that warming oceans are […]

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Tons of cool historic resurvey work at ESA

It was great to see so many sessions about using historical data to understand biological responses to climate change.  Lauren enjoyed participating in a symposium on Rapid Climate Change and Species Range Shifts: Observations, Predictions, and Management and an IGNITE session on Constraints in Ecology at ESA.  Thanks to the organizers for including our group in such great sessions.

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Biological impacts of tropical warming on ectotherms

Lauren had a great time revisiting Anolis research and the Caribbean at a stimulating symposium in Puerto Rico.

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Chasing grasshoppers and butterflies in the Rockies

Just back from an abbreviated field season in Boulder and Gothic, Colorado. Highlights included rigging our most instrumented weather station to date and wild flower-laden commutes over the Maroon passes to help collect butterflies at the Rocky Mountain Biological Lab.

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It’s fun to work at the Frontiers of Science

Lauren recently returned from a Kavli Frontiers of Science Symposium at the National Academy of Sciences in Irvine. It was a fun challenge to talk about the impacts of climate change on biodiversity with an interdisciplinary and international audience and to learn about research as broad as renewable energy, cosmic explosions, and invisibility.

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Looking for PhD students to join the lab at UW

Inquiries are welcome from graduate students interested in joining the lab at UW.  There are NSF-funded opportunities to work on examining the ecological and evolutionary consequences of phenotypes and ecological forecasting in fence lizards, butterflies, and grasshoppers.  There are also opportunities to initiate projects on related topics.  Students with strong quantitative skills are particularly encouraged […]

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Crossed our field sites in the Rockies and relocated to UW!

The Buckley Lab has moved westward.  Lauren is excited to join the UW Department of Biology starting July 1, 2013.

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