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Jeremy Rifkin

(http://faculty.washington.edu/krumme/readings/rifkin.html)


The Age of Access: The New Culture of Hypercapitalism Where All of Life Is a Paid-for Experience. May 2000. 320p. Putnam/Tarcher, $24.95 (1-58542-018-2).

Can Civilization Survive ? by Jeremy Rifklin + note on Rifkin Date: 4 Apr 2000 08:14:31 -0400 [Published on Monday, April 3, 2000 in the Los Angeles Times Can Civilization Survive With A Greatly Reduced Government And Cultural Sphere, With Only The Commercial Sphere Left As The Primary Mediator Of Human Life? by Jeremy Rifkin]

The Biotech Century: Harnessing the Gene and Remaking the World (1998).

The End of Work - The Decline of the Global Labor Force and the Dawn of the Post-Market Era, Tarcher/Putnam, New York, 1995.

Internet Sites:


Contents (End of Work)

    Acknowledgements (p.IX)
    Foreword by Robert L. Heilbroner (p.XI)
    Introduction (p.XV)

PART I: The Two Faces of Technology

  1. The End of Work (p.3)
  2. Trickle-down Technology and Market Realities (p.15)
  3. Visions of Techno-Paradise (p.42)

PART II: The Third Industrial Revolution

  1. Crossing into the High-Tech Frontier (p.59)
  2. Technology and the African-American Experience (p.69)
  3. The Grate Automation Debate (p.81)
  4. Post-Fordism (p.90)

PART III: The Decline of the Global Labor Force

  1. No More Farmers (p.109)
  2. Hanging Up the Blue Collar (p.128)
  3. The Last Service Worker (p.141)

PART IV: The Price of Progress

  1. High-Tech Winners and Losers (p.165)
  2. Requiem for the Working Class (p.181)
  3. The Fate of Nations (p.198)
  4. A More Dangerous World (p.208)

PART V: The Dawn of the Post-Market Area

  1. Re-engineering the Work Week (p.221)
  2. A New Social Contract (p.236)
  3. Empowering the Third Sector (p.249)
  4. Globalizing the Social Economy (p.275)


    Postscript (p.294)
    Notes (p.296)
    Bibliography (p.331)
    Index (p.337)


    Contents

      Acknowledgements (p.IX)
      Foreword by Robert L. Heilbroner (p.XI)
      Introduction (p.XV)

    PART I: The Two Faces of Technology

    1. The End of Work (p.3)
      • Substituting Software for Employees (p.5)
      • Re-Engineering (p.6)
      • A World Without Workers (p.11)

    2. Trickle-down Technology and Market Realities (p.15)
      • The Roaring Twenties (p.17)
      • The Gospel of Mass Consumption (p.19)
      • The 'Share the Work' Movement (p.25)
      • The New Deal (p.29)
      • The Postwar World (p.32)
      • New Realities (p.33)
      • Retraining for What? (p.36)
      • The Shrinking Public Sector (p.37)

    3. Visions of Techno-Paradise (p.42)
      • Engineering Utopia (p.45)
      • The Cult of Efficiency (p.48)
      • From Democracy to Technocracy (p.52)

    PART II: The Third Industrial Revolution

    1. Crossing into the High-Tech Frontier (p.59)
      • Machines That Think (p.60)
      • The Plugged-In Species (p.62)
      • Putting Computers to Work (p.66)

    2. Technology and the African-American Experience (p.69)
      • Caught Between Technologies (p.73)
      • Automation and the Making of the Urban Underclass (p.77)

    3. The Grate Automation Debate (p.81)
      • The Government Steers a Middle Course (p.82)
      • Labor's Capitulation (p.84)

    4. Post-Fordism (p.90)
      • Old-Fashioned Management (p.92)
      • The Switch to Lean Production (p.96)
      • Re-Engineering the Workplace (p.100)

    PART III: The Decline of the Global Labor Force

    1. No More Farmers (p.109)
      • Soil and Software (p.113)
      • Molecular Farming (p.118)
      • The End of Outdoor Agriculture (p.123)

    2. Hanging Up the Blue Collar (p.128)
      • Automating the Automobile (p.129)
      • Computing Steel (p.132)
      • The Silicon-Collar Workforce (p.136)

    3. The Last Service Worker (p.141)
      • At Your Service (p.143)
      • The Virtual Office (p.146)
      • Downsizing the Wholesale and Retail Sectors (p.151)
      • Digitizing the Professions, Education, and the Art (p.157)

    PART IV: The Price of Progress

    1. High-Tech Winners and Losers (p.165)
      • Squeezing the Little Guy (p.166)
      • The Declining Middle (p.170)
      • The New Cosmopolitans (p.172)
      • The Other America (p.177)

    2. Requiem for the Working Class (p.181)
      • High-Tech stress (p.182)
      • Biorythms and Burnout (p.186)
      • The New Reserve Army (p.190)
      • The Slow Death (p.194)

    3. The Fate of Nations (p.198)
      • High-Tech Politics in Europe (p.200)
      • Automating the Third World (p.203)

    4. A More Dangerous World (p.208)
      • The Global Problem (p.213)

    PART V: The Dawn of the Post-Market Area

    1. Re-engineering the Work Week (p.221)
      • Toward a High-Tech Workweek (p.224)
      • Workers' Claim on Productivity (227)
      • Modest Proposals (p.229)
      • Trading Work for Leisure (p.233)

    2. A New Social Contract (p.236)
      • Life Beyond the Market Place (p.239)
      • An Alternate Vision (p.243)

    3. Empowering the Third Sector (p.249)
      • A New Role for Government (p.250)
      • The Third Sector and Partisan Politics (p.251)
      • Making the Third Sector Work (p.256)
      • Shadow Wages for Volunteer Work (p.256)
      • Social Wage for Community Service (p.258)
      • Financing the Transition (p.268)

    4. Globalizing the Social Economy (p.275)
      • A New Voice for Democracy (p.278)
      • The Last, Best Hope (p.286)


      Postscript (p.294)
      Notes (p.296)
      Bibliography (p.331)
      Index (p.337)


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