Measuring Your Emotional Intelligence at Work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For each of the following items, rate how well you are able to display the ability described.  Before responding, try to think of actual situations in which you have had the opportunity to use the ability.

 

V

E

R

Y

 

S

L

I

G

H

T

 

A

B

I

L

I

T

Y

 

 

 

 

 

 

S

L

I

G

H

T

 

A

B

I

L

I

T

Y

 

 

 

 

M

O

D

E

R

A

T

E

 

A

B

I

L

I

T

Y

C

O

N

S

I

D

E

R

A

B

L

E

      

A

B

I

L

I

T

Y

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

G

R

E

A

T

 

A

B

I

L

I T

Y

1.  Associate different internal physiological cues with different emotions.

1

2

3

4

5

2.  Relax when under pressure in situations.

1

2

3

4

5

3.  ŗGear up˛ at will for a task.

1

2

3

4

5

4.  Know the impact that your behavior will have on others.

1

2

3

4

5

5.  Initiate successful resolution of conflict with others.

1

2

3

4

5

6.  Calm yourself quickly when angry.

1

2

3

4

5

7.  Know when you are becoming angry.

1

2

3

4

5

8.  Regroup quickly after a setback, stay motivated.

1

2

3

4

5

9.  Recognize when others are distressed.

1

2

3

4

5

10.  Build consensus with others.

1

2

3

4

5

11.  Know what senses you are currently using.

1

2

3

4

5

12.  Use internal ŗtalk˛ to change your emotional state.

1

2

3

4

5

13.  Can stay motivated when doing uninteresting work.

1

2

3

4

5

14.  Help others manage their emotions.

1

2

3

4

5

15.  Make others feel good.

1

2

3

4

5

16.  Identify when you experience mood shifts.

1

2

3

4

5

17.  Stay calm when you are the target of anger from others.

1

2

3

4

5

18.  Stop or change an ineffective habit.

1

2

3

4

5

19.  Show empathy toward others.

1

2

3

4

5

20.  Provide advice and emotional support to others as needed.

1

2

3

4

5

21.  Know when you become defensive.

1

2

3

4

5

22.  Know when you are thinking negatively and head it off.

1

2

3

4

5

23.  Follow your words and actions.

1

2

3

4

5

24.  Engage in intimate conversations with others.

1

2

3

4

5

25.  Accurately reflect peoplešs feelings back to them.

1

2

3

4

5

 

 

Scoring:

 

 

Subscale

Sum Questions:

Your Score:

     Self-awareness

1,6,11, 21

 

     Managing Emotions

2,7,12,17,22

 

     Motivating Yourself

3,8,13,18,23

 

     Empathy

4,9,14,19,24

 

     Social Skill

5,10,15,20,25

 

Total

 

 

 

 

Interpretation:

 

Overall:  If you scored above 100, you have high emotional intelligence in a work context.  A score of 50 to 100 means you have a good platform of EQ from which to develop your managerial capacity.  A score below 50 indicates that you realize you are probably below average in EQ.

 

Subscales:  For each of the five components of EQ‹self-awareness, managing emotions, motivating onešs self, empathy, and social skill‹a score above 20 is considered high, while a score below 10 is low. 

 

Self-Awareness:  This component provides the basis for all the other components of EQ.  Self-awareness means being aware of what you are feeling, being conscious of the emotions within yourself.  People who are in touch with their emotions are better able to guide their own lives.  Managers need to be in touch with their emotions in order to interact effectively and appreciate emotions in others.  Managers with high levels of sel-awareness learn to trust their Œgut feelingsš and realize that these feelings can provide useful information about  difficult decisions.  Answers are not always clear about direction,, strategy, courses of action and managers need to blend their experience, knowledge, analytical abilities into a proper response to each unique situation. 

 

Managing Emotions:  The extent to which someone is able to balance his or own moods such that worry, fear, anxiety, change and anger do not interfere with getting the job done.  Managers who can manage their emotions perform better because they are able to think clearly.  Managing emotions does not mean suppressing or denying them, but understanding them and using that understanding to deal with situations productively.  Managing emotions also does not mean managing through fear and intimidation.  Managers should first recognize a mood or feeling, think about what it means and how it affects them, and then choose how to act.  Learning to interpret how emotions affect othersš behavior is also useful.

 

Motivating Oneself: This is the ability to be hopeful and optimistic despite obstacles, setbacks, or even outright failures.  It is crucial for pursuing long-term goals in life, or in business.  A classic example of the crucial role of self-motivation was demonstrated in a study conducted by MetLife Insurance Company.  A special group of job applicants who tested high on optimism but failed the normal sales aptitude test were hired, in spite of their performance on the standard selection tests.  Compared to salespeople who passed the regular aptitude test, but scores high on pessimism, the Œoptimistic˛ group made 21 percent more sales in their first year and 57 percent more in their second (Hequet, ŗFlat and Happy?˛ Training, April 1995, pps 29-34)

 

Empathy: The extent to which you can Œput yourself in someone elsešs shoes,š or explore someone elsešs cage is the fourth component of EQ.  Can you recognize what someone else is feeling without them having to tell you?  Sometimes when they donšt even know, or canšt quite articulate, what they are feeling?  Most of the time people donšt tell us what they fell in words, but rather in tone of voice, boy language, and facial expressions.  Empathy is built from self- awareness, and then the ability to transcend your own cage in order to understand the feelings, perspective and experiences of the other person.  Being attuned to onešs own emotions can make it easier to read and understand the feelings of others.

 

Social Skill:  The ability to connect to others, build positive relationships, appropriately respond to the emotions of others, and influence others is the final component of EQ.  Social skill benefits managers in their interpersonal relationships to handle disagreements, resolve conflicts, unite team members together, influence others, etc. 

 

From Weisinger, H. (1998).  Emotional Intelligence at Work.  San Francisco: Jossey-Bass: 214-5.