Example: Vertigo (3)

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This scene from Vertigo is a good example for the importance of shot/coutershot in classical Hollywood cinema. It is one of the stock schemata of Hollywood film editing, which the filmmaker has ready to hand in order to represent any two figures, groups, or objects within the same place. This schema can be fitted to many situations, whatever the differences in figure placement, camera height, lighting, or focus; whether the figures are facing one another, or not, etc. Because of the tradition behind the schema, the viewer in turn expects to see the shot/countershot figure, especially if the first shot of the combination appears. (from: Bordwell 1985).


In this scene, note how seamlessly the shot/countershot figure is woven into the continuity editing technique and how it is here used to draw in the audience to this important episode in the developing romance.

 

 
 

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uups . . .

 
 

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